Interesting Facts On Rosa Parks – Unknown Amazing Facts About Rosa Parks

Interesting Facts On Rosa Parks – Unknown Amazing Facts About Rosa Parks
Spread the love

Would you like to know more about Nita Wiggins and Rosa Parks? Please check her out at: https://www.nitawiggins.com/theauthor/ Video Transcript

and today we have a wonderful guest and before I introduce her I’d love to give a shout out to everyone on the internet that has been watching Bandersnatch and that is the latest episode of black mirror and if you haven’t watched it do yourself a favor because it’s one of those play action key it’s games it’s very interactive and it determines who you are as a person when you make that decision so everyone has a different ending it is so much fun and I wanted to give a shout out to that show because it’s apropos for our guest today we are going to talk about if Rosa Parks was alive today you know what would be her opinion how much you matriculate through out our social will die our social interface that we have all over it’s just so different from generations ago but we have an expert about that that can talk in greater detail than we can without further ado I’d like to welcome from the wonderful city of Perry neither Wiggins welcome to the podcast Nia Thank You Hamza hello hello good to see you yes thanks for being here it’s always interesting to talk about what what would it be like if these people would live in today’s times because one interesting question that I’ve been asked in the business world I’m sure you’ve been asked and just socially people ask if you can if you could have dinner with three different people from history who would you have dinner with hey and you’re kind of putting your eyes in the back your head doing a recall or remember you being asked that question and I’m sure we can kind of go over some of that at some detail but before we get too deep in the weeds I’d like for you to talk a little bit about yourself and how my sisters live overseas and they’re always asked how do they get over there so I’d like for you to talk a little bit about your background and how you wound up to live in that beautiful city okay well sure I like that question and hamsa I imagine you’ve heard many different answers so here’s my okay I was living my American dream I had set out a vision I reached it and then as I saw that the American dream I had my grips on was slipping away I had to start thinking professionally what can I do to transform to transfer myself to where I would be happy where I could still meet my goals and have a fulfilling life and fortunately I had come to France for the Tour de France more times to cover it and I decided during one of those visits that this could be a place I would try to recreate life and go from having an American dream to having a world dream that I could immerse myself into so it was a career transition but it really also was a way to save myself because I felt what’s sinking trying to hold on my a version of the American Dream I love it it’s been some time there it’s a little close to my heart like I said men shinned I had to sit or actually one sister now one passed away years ago one lives in bar score that one went to Barcelona and my twin sister lives in my ARCA and so they were you have we have this conversation in our family but from what you’re saying as well as far as the American dream I do want to stay there for one second because we’re gonna talk about Rosa Parks and at the time maybe a generation or two the definition of the American dream is a moving target so if you could talk about what was the traditional American dream quote-unquote and how you may have reach that and decided is that all there is yeah it’s a scary thing to have a dream and then to achieve it because then what do you do when you’re in your dream but I was eight years old when my version of happiness appeared in front of me and in front of my eyes I would watch a lot of sports on television with my father and I would specifically watch the NFL pro football and I was so enthralled in the games and the the idea of preparation and success that I saw in sports that I wanted to somehow get involved in that as a girl I knew I would not be a football player and at the same time I noticed how my dad was so enthralled with competition and success and so I decided I would become one of those analysts one of those journalists who was right there in the heart of the NFL and for me that meant the Dallas cap covering the Dallas Cowboys zoom thirty years later I am hired in Dallas Texas do you can’t give me a thumbs down on that this is Eagle country over here I’m sorry I can’t even apologize congratulations on your Super Bowl by the way but for me the excellence of competition seemed to be right there in Dallas and so I decided at age eight that I would get to Dallas I would somehow I get hired I would prepare and with my excellence with my skills I would live and work there as a reporter covering the Dallas Cowboys and I did get there I was hired in 1999 and worked there for nine years at the Fox TV station that broadcast the Dallas Cowboys games so I was in heaven I was interviewing Tony Dorsett Roger Staubach Rayfield Wright Troy Aikman Deion Sanders all the people you and Philadelphia don’t want to hear about she and her college were all Gator fans and so when my sister middle sister was in school she was at school with what’s that Emmitt Smith yes she once he took some classes with the image so that was do you know her big thing and cheating each other’s tests wait wink we like the right right of course so it was a it was a lovely life I was enjoying what I was doing because I had reached that pinnacle but I started getting negative evaluations from my managers you know you’re not doing enough you’re not breaking storage but this is not true of course I say it’s not true but the evidence is on the videotapes and the interviews of people I did in their homes and this and that the problem was I I was turning 40 and in America it’s a tough thing sometimes for a woman to continue in a coveted position age 40 and above and and so as I say the dream was slipping away I continued to look for some new accreditation some new skill I started studying French I wrote proposals to come to the Tour de France because Lance Armstrong from Dallas was competing in it and and I was broadening what I felt I could bring to the journalism table but none of it were and and as I realized that I was not going to be able to finish my professional career in Dallas I started setting my sights on something else and for me that was to teach journalism in a francophone country because I had learned French by that time and I had travelled to Senegal a french-speaking country I went there to cover a basketball story that I proposed and so suddenly what had been my vision of my American dream was too small for me I wanted a world to grab at and a world to touch and a world to influence and I can say that I am so happy and satisfied if journalism job that I have now because I have have had students from over 20 countries probably even 25 I don’t want to exaggerate so I’ll say at least 20 countries and they leave my University where I teach and they have a taste of the strategy I quickly then used that I was to to build my own career with so so that that’s my position that’s when my American didn’t fit me anymore not only because I was somehow outside of the demographic had the right to do that but I created a whole new demographic to pursue and and I’m living that now one of our first podcast we did was God winks and so we we subscribe to the idea that there’s no accidents and so it kind of leads into the whole Rosa Parks things as well because when at their time they couldn’t even imagine where we are going to be in 2019 just like we can’t imagine what people that follow us are gonna be like in 20 49 say no way right and so when you were talking to make me think of your counterpart Pam Oliver you know since it is Sunday and football and we do play the Bears today but so Pam was having the same issue and we we saw that on a national scale that like you said from a demographic viewpoint she had a plum job and she was kind of upset that she had to go to these secondary tertiary markets that she couldn’t you know it was kind of late you climb the ladder so you don’t have to do that anymore you go back and you’re wondering is this my lot in life and some people stop there and you actually took that as a challenge for yourself you know shout out to your dad as well is like what can I be my best self and take it to the next level yes thank you for mentioning my dad because when I was a kid I I started watching NASCAR at age four I was watching NASCAR before Dale Earnhardt senior was a full-time driver was watching because my dad was watching and I was sitting at his elbow and then I started watching baseball and football and my dad would ask me about the games I was analyzing the NFL before I was adding fractions at school and I had followed masks are also from that point you know so early on and so my dad homeschooled me to be a sports journalist but we never would have imagined that’s what he was doing but he would ask me what I thought about the game who would win and I would sell out tell him why and he’d either agree or disagree but then he’d use his grown-up words to clarify and so the next time when he’d asked me I’d use his grown-up words so I started this career pursuits so long ago but it was because my dad engaged with me in just the right way and my father was an instructor he was an instructor at Fort Gordon in the signal towers division you know in communications so he was an instructor and little did we know that his give-and-take with me was setting me up to do exactly what I wanted to do so talk about God wings that’s definitely a God wink absolutely I do want to ask you about as a fellow educator ray and I don’t have children but there is a school of thought of some parents that Oh baby look at the baby smile and there’s others that talk to the child as an adult and it’s in the school of thought is that you increase their capability a lot sooner when you speak to them in that manner and it seems like you’re proof positive that your dad didn’t coddle you as a little girl daddy’s little girl you know enemy in sorry you actually took it to the next level and you probably surprised a lot of people they did let’s talk a little bit about that because we’re we’re we’re intertwining there were whole worlds of parts thing from from my standpoint we’re looking at it from a gender standpoint but we’re all looking at it from a professional standpoint and so oh you go over here with pom-poms and cheerlead for us over here you’re like no you you’re missing the white outs and you’re calling out blaze that the little boys your counterparts can’t even understand that’s true that’s true I do have to say though that I love dance and when the cowgirls the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders premiered in 1972 wow the whole presentation the whole marketing the whole razzle bath is what drew me to Dallas and so it wasn’t the sports for sure but the overall presentation and having lived and worked there in Dallas for 19 years it’s still ranked very high from you know that there’s not much the shine was not this far when I was there so it all came together for me I’ve lived a fortunate life to have had something to pursue to have reached it and then to have outgrown it to the point where now I can train myself to do other things and then teach those skills so I’ve had a blessed life I do what I actually asked you about that transition and I’d love to get your opinion from a historical standpoint so in 1492 you know we we have the whole Christopher Columbus ideal right and at the time people thought that the world was flat and so I asked people from time to time that in nineteen twenty nineteen a lot of people in the states still concerned the world flat in that if you know that nothing exists outside of the United States if you leave the United States are going to fall off into the abyss and you’re proof positive that there’s life outside of the US bubble yeah there is life outside of the bubble there is a fascinating woman I I found her profile on online just this week her name is Evita Robinson and you guys might already know her but she has something called no madness travel tribe and when I first heard it I thought it was like no madness but it’s like nomads miss Savile tribe and it’s a tribal group of women of color and in her interview she said her group is now 21,000 people worldwide and so when thinks a group of ladies gets on an airplane to go somewhere you can expect that there will be a lot of fun and so who would have imagined back in the time of Rosa Parks that 21,000 women of color would have the means and would have the vision beyond their neighborhoods to go and explore other lands so who knows where we’re headed I can’t tell you what will look like in 30 years as a civilization but that travel group gives me such such a I don’t know such an excitement about everything segments of the population jumping out and enjoying life absolutely and since we’re giving shoutouts I have to give a shout out yesterday there’s no accidents and so I had turned on the television because I’m binging on the show that I don’t want to talk about right now well doctor when I I was just the television it turned on and there was an infomercial on right in during this infomercial they introduced Heather Woolery Lloyd I don’t know if you know her or not I can’t place her for the moment No maybe I did she’s a black dermatologist woman and they were talking about and I think this is appropriate for when we’re talking about what could Rosa Parks imagine she’s a dermatologist and they had the spectrum of women so they had a women of color so they had Morpheus or we know Laurence Fishburne’s wife she’s in suits they had a width of the Spanish woman from CSI Miami they had Kim Coles who was a comedian and they just had a it was just I had that I had to keep watching it even though it was makeup I mean there’s so many beautiful women on the screen like no guy would turn at this point like yours like you were like you were hinting at that for decades there there in the industry or they’re just regular people and they wanted makeup or skincare and the markets just didn’t speak to them so they decided hey we’re gonna take it amongst ourselves and have this product for us and so yeah you were saying with this nomad travel that’s phenomenal and that is a beautiful thing with our interaction you’re in you’re in Paris right now in were speaking to you so the sky is the limit list as to where we can go with it and part of it is I love talking about mrs. parks because when I interviewed her in 1988 I was working for a television station and I was a one-woman band so I shot my own video and I did my own interviews but I thought I would take a few moments before the program began to walk over and say something to mrs. parks and it was amazing we stood almost and her face resembled my grandmother on my father’s side when we spoke her southern accent sounded like of my grandmother on my mother’s side so here I am with the mother of the civil rights movement and I feel that my grandmother’s are there with me and and actually they were you know what I mean absolutely I feel like I connected to them through her because her storyline and the limits on what she could do in society we’re the same as my grandmother’s and so before the ceremony I asked I said may I give you a hug and I said I never do this but may I give you a hug I had nothing else to offer and we hugged and I remember that we’re just breathing their hearts with our hearts near each other and I felt maybe I needed to let go of her because maybe I had been aggressive in doing what I did so I let go and she was still holding me and so now when I see these women who are doing things every because somebody somewhere back in our personal histories someone we encountered gave us something and we want to keep that light shining or we want to to blow the next generation a little farther down the road we want to do something and so that is what mr. X does for me when I think of her and that day and these women who travel may Jameson who we know travel to outer space you know these women when we’re doing something it’s because we’re taking our ancestors or even people we never met forward and and I’m one of the people who’s driven to keep going forward to not let some let some wall get in the way not let some limitation stop what I want take forward from people who gave me something that you wanted to interview or was this someone else’s initial idea you know I kick myself all the time about the interview you know the event before it was fantastic for me but the interview I was working for WT p.m. in Columbus Georgia and the assignment manager called me that morning and said hey you’re interviewing Rosa Parks this morning she’ll be in Tuskegee Alabama so take your news car and as the one woman band go over and do the story that’s it great fine and I did no research I did nothing other than to prepare myself and I drove over and had I been more serious or had I thought about the significance of the interview I would have done some work beforehand didn’t and so when I went I knew as a journalist I knew that I must focus on something that would interest people and so her pride at that point in 1988 was to emphasize to people the need to vote the importance of voting and so my story I used a clip of where she talks about the importance of voting on a journalism scale it was a serviceable serviceable report it was functional had I done my research I would have found out that mrs. Parkes was more of the mindset of Malcolm X than dr. King and I could have asked her to give the reasons to give her viewpoints to delve into that part of her activism but I didn’t know and now I kicked myself because if I had been the journalist to ask her why Bhau not Margit it would be my interview clip that the world plays over and over when the docile appearing woman says militancy not so meet militancy over meetings that would have been my work had I done a better job of journalism and as a result of that I could create a research research technique that I now teach so that I will not let another opportunity to find to find the information and put it out to the world so that opportunity doesn’t get away again so it was meeting her was a momentous event of my life the most momentous picking currents in my life but for a journalism and success just mediocre I was functional I was not super and the world is lacking the information because I wasn’t super at my job that day yeah it’s really heavy she’s a she’s not really polarizing as you said and from a marketing standpoint a week timing is everything right if we talk about God linked to what have you yeah so when when I was just thinking in my head we’re gonna interview Neeta about you know what if Rosa Parks was alive today it made me think from a numerology standpoint because in the school of numerology you don’t really start looking at people until the age of 28 and so it was really interesting in college I remember I had going to Clark Atlanta so I okay very probably better than I guessed a traditional American as far as the Black Studies because we were a race here in Atlanta so when most people would say Oh Martin Malcolm they try to separate the two there were so much commonalities that are not in the main media and so when in numerology after 28 there’s periods of your life like every nine years and so it’s just interesting of who you interview and where they are at that time so as we were driving over here to our conference room David was like well we’re talking about who were gonna here to do next and out and he had mentioned Malcolm Gladwell so I do want to give a shout out to him because he has a podcast if you do not listen to it it’s called revisionist history and so have you let’s do you listen to it I’ve heard of it I have not listened I think you know I think you’ll really like it there’s three seasons of it now they just finished the third season and what’s episode to this conversation is the perception and so and one of his one of his podcast he was talking about Sammy Davis jr. right and Sammy Davis jr. in 1972 he had come out and he was it wasn’t tongue-kissing but he was like really buddy-buddy hugging Richard Nixon okay Nixon at the time was not family friendly or he was not friendly to the people to people of color right yes it’s okay really ostracized Sammy Davis jr. for that and he never really lived that down and so whenever people look at him historically they’re like all that sellout what have you and so Malcolm Gladwell was making the correlation between or trying to make the correlation between Sammy Davis jr. in last year and currently Kanye West right and so you ask well what age are the are you interviewing this person are they in their teens or their 20s or the 30s because they’re so different you see where I’m getting at uh yes you’re right and so when historically we look at more because we were in January we’re about to go into Black History Month and all that they always paint the picture of mouth of Martin it I did a dream which was 1964 but he died in 1968 and so a lot of the messages that he said afterwards were akin to a Malcolm X they were a lot in the same mindset yes yes of course but when we talk about revisionist history for one thing that’s why I was mentioning the book the rebellious life of mrs. Rosa Parks in my schools in Augusta Georgia in public school I did not know mrs. Parks was married she was born Rosa McCauley so so right there my vision of her as as I absorb the lessons is that she was a tiny little seamstress spinster played a church lady rocking-chair know she was a rebel from the age of eight she attempted to hit a white boy with a brick because he pushed her and so she took a brick and was going to do something with the brick but some adults in the area stopped this from happening and then mrs. parks Grenville Rosa Macaulay’s grandmother told her you can’t attack white people because something is going to happen to you you know you’ll be late you’ll be you know you’ll face it a terrible end if you don’t stop trying to attack and and get even with white people who might do something to you and in her book and Rosa Parks my story she says that that really hurt her to her heart that her dear grandmother told her to be docile but that’s the lesson that I learned about mrs. Rosa Parks that she was a doll no she wasn’t it was and as a matter of fact when we hear she was a seamstress she was a tailor which means she could work on men’s clothes so she was an accomplished woman within her subset of never liked that consciousness until recently until my life here in France mrs. Parkes it was a meeting a specialist it was part of her job to make sure that what media knew what was happening in the black community she had many skills beyond knitting sewing and rocking in a chair which is the way she was presented to me yes where my entire life she really she really was remarkable and even her grandfather from her book she talks about being a child and sitting up at night on the front porch in rural Alabama with her grandfather who had his shotgun because the KKK had been burning homes and trees and crosses in their neighborhood and she learned at age six to defend yourself I never did that there a lot of things under under the rug that when we have podcasts with people like you they come to the surface so you know thank you for your service than that as well I didn’t want to stay there for one second because like you mentioned all the all the things about her outside of the package that we didn’t know about and an education continues to evolve so you know at the time maybe it was perfect to do that and it reminds me of an interview I just recently watched with Bill Duke he was on on vlad and he’s in his 70s and his great-grandparents were slaves right and so he was just talking about the differences then and now and he had mentioned i hate to even talk about this now but hashtags right because when you live in social media and he’s like if you do a hashtag store still a huge issue of colorism around the world but specifically in America and there’s teen light skin team dark-skinned and what-have-you and the reason why I bring it up is for my understanding the packaging was Rosa wasn’t the only one that was asked to get up off the bus but because of the packaging of her being a seamstress is smaller in lighter complexion it was easier from a package to actually get that out get that message out there and I don’t know what your take is on that I just was reading on history comm this past week and I found three factual mistakes according to the research and the documents I’ve read and so I stopped reading and I sent an email to say you know let’s discuss this I’m a Rosa Parks researcher so let’s get some of this cleared up and so part of it is that the day that mrs. Parks didn’t get up and and give up her seat it was not a white passenger who said you know I want my place there the bus driver a man named James thread said and you know southern speak y’all know I gotta have those seats and the other black people sitting on the same row that mrs. parks was sitting on got up and moved she did not heated her seat the bus driver and the reason it was such a defiant act is that passengers bus drivers kept weapons bus drivers were armed they were they were packing they had guns and it was legal to have yeah when she decided she was moving she was not reading a white man’s world she was refusing the system that was trying to be carried out by an apart white man so that is what mrs. parks did it it’s much to me it’s much bigger than a one to one refusal to yield she sat down to show her discontent with the system and even I was I just pulled a quote from her and I’ll read that for you so she said this in 1993 and I watched a video it was the essence awards and on the stage she says I pray that one day we would not have to be insulted mistreated and sometimes physically hurt and often killed because we just wanted to be free people we will never go back where we were and so when I when I think if something like that when that her conviction was just the insults must stop his treatment must stop freedom for what I wanted must begin to me that is is not necessarily what I was taught but it resonates with many more people when we consider basic the facts which are basic desires so so and I think it’s important that we understand the motivation of people when when they take a stand when they refuse to yield it’s so much more than a once one compensation it’s to destroy and dismantle the system and a lot of people don’t think about this that Emmitt Till unfortunately his name is so well known even in France that people know his but Emmitt Till the teenager who was the black teenager who was kidnapped and killed in lanced shot any of things did you know that was in August 1955 mrs. Parks refused to yield her seat in December and there was already an organization in place that was going to launch a boycott when mrs. parks didn’t move a according to her own writings it was partly in response to what had happened to Emmett Till the teenager so she again was trying to halt a system that was destroying people that was mistreating people and killing people absolutely that which leads to a two-part question – as a journalist I always wanted to talk to her that’s a question right so the first part is is my forget her name right now author and know I was thinking Maya Rudolph but I’m not talking to her I’m talking about I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings please Angelo Thank You Mai Angelo’s redundant now I know I apologize in advance see this so Maya Angelou Road I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and she was talking about Billie Holiday and herself in some level know when she went overseas she was treated better than he did in the States and I know as we talk in 2019 and a little bit before that both of my sisters you know they they had their citizenship here but it’s highly unlikely that they would come back just because the quality of life is just better in the way that they’re treated he’s over there is a lot better and then the second part is if we look at it from a big picture and you’re talking about systems after slavery was over in the 18th after the 1860s there was like well what are we doing with these people we don’t want them here anymore you know well they it were a nuisance right and I’m bringing it to you because from my understanding after World War 2 Africans were huge people that had come to France and help rebuild France and now that France is rebuilt in other places in Europe they want them to go home and there’s a lot of uprisings about that and you’re right in the middle of that so you have a very specific point that I would love for you to share so the first part of it you asked about if life is better in Europe than in America for for me for my generation for african-americans oh I think that’s the way that you’re posing the question right that’s one way to look at it yeah well for me I was born a journalist right and for me to practice what I was born to do at the highest level I had talked out in the United States right I reached my dream but then that window started closing and so for me at this stage of my life the most important thing for me to do professionally is to teach journalism and to teach to a world wide audience but people who come from the worldwide diaspora I have this year nine years now teaching I have eclipsed 1,000 students it fit each of those 1000 it’s one little thing that I says then there is a possibility that I have the best selves oh wow okay hey Nina can you hear us yes yes so perfect we were having we had lost you on our end at the port that we’re using in a conference room and now we’re back so good okay great okay we actually lost she didn’t notice she probably solve the world’s problems that we thought we had to call you back it’s that intrinsic motivation that had met had me going we have to get your answer conclusion of it is that it is a remarkable fact of Rosa Macaulay’s life that her grandparents were born into slavery but that her mother Leona McAuley was it was able to get education and the mother of Rosa Parks became a teacher and then and was living a comfortable life but then that is exactly when the Jim Crow laws were were written to to slow people down to back people up to stop that forward progress so so Rosa McCauley as a little girl saw many things she knew of the suffering of her grandparents because I’ve read her quotes about this she saw the opportunity her mother created by becoming an educated person and now Rosa McCauley herself did not finish junior high and did not finish high school because her grandmother became ill and it was the costume for a female child to stay home in a case like that so Rose McCauley didn’t finish high school but mrs. Rosa Parks got her equivalency after Raymond parks her husband suggested she go and get an equivalent let’s see – a high school education what they did at the time back then it’s not the same as our GED today that’s she took advantage of those opportunities because she knew of them and knew they were important when she made that decision when you’re interviewing her did you get a sense or did you ask her how did she feel about being a symbol of civil rights yes I did ask her not on camera but when we were talking before the ceremony I asked did you realize what you were doing what you were starving and she said no I was just tired and then she kind of clarified she says not that my feet were hurting she says but I have made up my mind not giving legal racism anymore so she just drew the line in this and then the rest of the world you know I think that’s a really good part especially you know in 2019 as he passed away a couple of years ago I remember when Prince passed away a couple of years ago I remember when I was actually in the Lynn University Center and the not in the mid 90s and people like Prince and some other celebrities that are still living they donated a lot of money to historically black colleges but they didn’t want the fanfare that went along with it they were just like this is what I want to do and in 2019 there’s more of a like the I’ll make a joke of it they Facebook if I didn’t show a picture that I worked out did I really work out today you know and so there is one level of how much moving forward of how we can even imagine especially in working with Rosa Parks and other people of definite distinction how much of it has to be broadcasted to have an effect I know it’s an it’s it’s a terrible situation that we have some people feel they have to capture it for it to have been real but in in another way let’s turn it around a little bit I have the good fortune to visit the Montgomery another Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery and I was talking with the tour guide and after the tour she mentioned that there was currently a campaign to raise money for a statue of dr. King in Montgomery and she says there is no statue of him in Montgomery now then I checked online there are statues in several places across Europe and I don’t have the list clear in my head at the moment but not in Montgomery and so to me like the Facebook photograph I think there needs to be proof of in in the form of a statue to show that dr. King did something and he did a lot of it there in Montgomery because that he is not recognized in a statue at Montgomery is not an oversight it is an act there is an obstacle and the tour director said this said as much they’re you know there’s this holdup in some parts in some communities in Montgomery that does not want a statue of dr. King I was in Montgomery for that particular visit my uncle their food me a statue of one of the Confederates physicians but he was a physician who did medical procedures on enslaved women that any foreign anesthesia and this is right there front of the State House in Montgomery so so sometimes there needs to be a tangible form of something sometimes we have to have a tangible form we need a statue I really when you thank you for that answer I agree with you in that aspect it made me think of the movie dr. strange I don’t know if you watched any Marvel comics but it’s family just passed away so a lot of those movies here in Atlanta so we have a strong tie to it film industry but many people don’t know that like you were saying if we don’t have that something tangible then they can get away with creating that superhero from Doctor Strange in that movie who was actually taken from the historical figure Pascal I can’t remember his last name right now but he was actually the first or recognized as the first black met a physician in the United States who started he brought the Rosicrucians and all of them here and he looks a lot like Doctor Strange he was a mixed heritage but you know as you know with that one dropper role he was considered black here in the decades and so when people watch that movie they have no association with that and we see that in generationally of not having something tangible so then if we don’t have something tangible we’re not sharing those stories then they can become endeared into a different agenda that’s not accurate yes but what we would you were saying about destroying buildings and and preserving preserving heritage historically black schools and things like that two things I don’t know that we could talk about both of them but you know there is the Rosa Parks house and a lot of people may not know about this I only heard about this maybe two years ago but after she left Montgomery and in Tuskegee and she left the Alabama area she lived in Detroit for almost 50 years and so she followed her brother Sylvester who had left Alabama seeking a better job a better job opportunity in Detroit so when mrs. parks there she followed him Sylvester and she and her husband and her mother moved into the house that semester McCauley was was living in oh and get this now there were seventeen family members living in a two-story house and it was on South Dade Street but they were living in this home because it was not enough housing stock available for african-americans and neighborhoods were segregated that house was slated to be torn down about 8,000 houses Detroit but it so happens that an artist named Ryan Mendoza bought the house and Mendoza he’s an American but he was living in Germany so he transported the house to Berlin and the house was on display in Berlin for a number of years and then he had the idea now that the home is restored let’s bring it back to him okay let’s set it on the White House lawn to the garden herded by mrs. Oakshott Michelle Obama the only problem is that by the time Ryan Mendoza had created his plan President Trump is in office so that the restored Rosa Parks home has been it’s not it’s not confirmed yet what where the Rosa Parks home will end up but it’s one of those things that is important in our history and even the artist he says how is it that nobody in America decided to do something about this home to pretty home and he said that the home really is the metaphor from mrs. parks she was in Alabama and she was unfair tected you know the grandfather with the shotgun KKK the death threat she goes north as did many African Americans and life they still was not good enough so the Rosa Parks home then goes to Berlin its rescued by Europe and the artist wants nothing more when once nothing more than for the home that symbolizes amidst the parts to be welcomed back in America yeah happens with that but but to me it’s that story the way you and I started out the conversation I’m in Europe because what I was an American ran its course there was no more wiggle room from 80 to 60 for me to move forward and put a drink doing so who knows where oh yeah I think it’s huge me that you’re talking about that and that’s where I’ll you know it was kind of tongue-in-cheek about you know which person to you interview as far as like a Rosa Parks or anyone for that matter do you interview I’m going back to the numerology example do you interview them when there are 25 you interview them when they’re 45 do your interview on wonder 85 and what’s happening now is two things here in the States one over this past week they released the documentary for our killing and so you know they were talking about a lot of a lot of things that are happening under the table that are now being brought to light it was like well how come people didn’t know about it then did they know about it and didn’t talk about it and then the other side is with these in the nineties you had these three strikes laws so you had a lot of people in jail for 20 plus years and they’re now they’re getting else and if they were big drug dealers and things like that and now they’re you know 50 something they’re going back into those communities that they summated and me in those areas are gentrified and they’re like wow I had all this money and I this could have been a totally different area and now there’s they don’t own anything and that area is decimated so right it’s just really interesting as far as what what we’re sharing is there’s probably just not a lot of community type communication going on for example my my locals I hated it at the time but they used to put me in a headlock a lot when I would come around with the music I thought was hip and new at the hip hop at the time and they were like they just sample so and so and so I had a greater appreciation for jazz and music before me just because I had that relationship with family members and from a larger scale I don’t I don’t think that’s happening so when you give that example of the Rosa Parks house happening outside the United States it’s sad but it makes that right and and as as i’m ryan mendoza asks he says when can Rosa Parks figuratively returned to the United States of course yes yes because we’ve probably all heard that Claudette Colvin was a teenager when she was thrown off of the bus even before mrs. parks was thrown off the bus and Claudette and I’ll call her Claudette because I’m referring to her during her childhood Claudette was one of the teenagers who would go to mrs. parks in civil disobedience we we know that mrs. parks had no children she and Raymond were or childless or I say child free but they were child free but mrs. parks often had the young people in their home in the parks family home to train them in civil disobedience and yes Claudette as a teenager was one of them because the age difference mrs. parks was two years old when she was erected and Claudette Colvin was 15 years old when she was arrested and the arrests at the teenager nine months for mrs. parks rest so yes they all knew each other and I I do like mentioning that there are some women in Montgomery and who were part of this bus movement who just don’t make it to the history books but for example or really a broader or we could say oh really a Browder BR owd er in the lawsuit Browder versus Gail that is the lawsuit that Fred gray Thurgood Marshall had pursued that went to the Supreme Court that struck down segregated seating on the buses and currently the son of Aurelia Browder is trying to make sure his mother’s rubble is part of story of Montgomery our teachers our history books our reporters we like to talk about one figure to symbolize a movement but mrs. browner at work actually a total of four women were part of the lawsuit now there’s also a Claudette Colvin was also part of that lawsuit there are four names on Browder versus Gale and Gale the city commissioner the head of the government of the city at the time and it was only with the with the successful outcome of the lawsuit that the bus boycott was called off Fred gray and Thurgood Marshall other attorneys had conferred and they said yes Montgomery businesses have a problem if our boycott they want us back they want to beat us better but the attorney said unless the law change this we will return to the same insults and mistreatment so when I talk about mrs. I need to say that other women were involved and then even there’s a woman Joanne Robinson who was one of the organizers of a boycott that was be no to put in place before business parts was he arrested and then one other woman said to me Clark it’s septum–ah Clark and she was an educator and when the bus boycott organizers needed to send out flyers miss Clark went to her school and photocopy so that they would have brochures and all that prints off she was risking not only the end of her teaching career that’s just many other negative things have come her way if anyone had tied her to the spread of the Flyers that talked about the boycott so these people it said they just happen to be but these are people who don’t get discussed even though they have such a significant part play or played such a significant part in the success of the boycott which changed the accommodations on our transport systems so I do want to check in with you because we are at that our point but I don’t know the next time we’ll get the have Nita Wiggins on so if you don’t mind staying on a few I just have a couple extra questions if you don’t mind of course I’d love to continue talking thank you for saying that I’d love to two points again give another shout out to Malcolm Gladwell I think you will highly highly enjoy listening to that revisionist history podcast he does interview educator it was fifty or sixty years after Brown versus Board of Education and they asked the landlady I can’t remember her name now that you know what she think she was there right at the beginning and she had given an answer that probably wasn’t the nice bow gift-wrap answer just based on what you were saying as far as unsung unsung heroes that even highlighting but you were talking about these boycotts and economically it put a dent into the travel system energy so highly right stated and this week this week ted i believe his name is cook tim cook who was the CEO of Apple and had come out with their numbers of last quarter and they didn’t meet expectations and they didn’t meet expectations because of the trade wars that were having with China right now and because of those boycotts they didn’t make their numbers and the technology sector had pretty much stumbled so we were on the world scale we’ve recognized that we do need to work with China we realize an example that you gave when we got together and banded together we were able to boycott and economically make a huge impact on the systems back then think as far as economic sanctions or economic solidarity what part does that play as people listen to this podcast learn about the messages about Rosa Parks in community outreach as a whole right and spending your dollars in your community and I have to mention Medgar Evers and for me it was a surprise that my very woke diaspora friends in France did not know Medgar Evers but I’m talking friends from Guadeloupe and other primarily black countries or even African countries but you know the success of what Medgar Evers was doing by as an N double ACP field director in Jackson Mississippi by telling people if they could not make on black people if they could not work at a particular shopping center or particular store and that’s not the place to go by and that that particular customer were called bully or girl instead of mr. or miss then that also placed to not so yes I am for the idea of if my treatment or my groups treatment is not up to par then I don’t choose to be a customer in there and I agree when people decide to take their dollars elsewhere what I found out about a community here in France and I don’t know the name of the community but one of my lady friends told me that there are some places in France where business people have created their own currency which simply means a book or a coffee shop that a grocery store maybe though the people who live in that community can circulate their own and see at the businesses that now why useful in our modern class because there’s a tax agent when businesses business owners accept the exchange that that’s coming from others it works just fine and so yes I do believe that’s spending our money in a place that we respect it’s that whole corporate responsibility idea if a corporation is not meeting my goals or my ideas why supporting what that business dust why am ia Faline the continuation of something that might be contrary to my and so yes I’m for that we had two two examples that comes to mind last year or one was and this one was kind of touching to me just because I know people of all walks of life as I’m sure you do and I know why people call there kids monkey and all that right my little monkey and but from this standpoint hmm got in a lot of trouble when they use that black kid and called him a king of a the monkey king of the jungle or something like that your last year they actually had to close a lot of stores we I mean they had with the equivalent of some economic sanctions that really shut them down last year and the other one that comes to mind is Starbucks when those two gentlemen were arrested in Philadelphia and that was really strong here in Atlanta because I have family that was graduating from Spelman and the c-level person that was the PR person for Starbucks after that she was also a spell Spelman alum and she was chosen to speak at their graduation and there was a lot of backlash of you know what is our what is our position with some of these companies and you we talked about a little bit about the glass ceiling that you may sometimes face I’ve been looking outside of becoming a global citizen and as a result so I guess that that fight will continue on in 2019 and beyond beyond of what maybe Rosa Parks thought about or maybe what we even can imagine oh I guess of course and when you mentioned Facebook there was the N double AC PS campaign hashtag get out Facebook and that was in result as a result of them of the the Senate report the US Senate report that showed Facebook allowed marketers to to be very invasive with people of color and and dig deep into their profiles and and from the research I did it said that of 33 a particular account that were designed to that false accounts that over half was targeting the cut the customers are Facebook friends of color with the particular idea to either find out it’s people of color revoking or to sway them in a particular way and so the n-double-a-cp launched a campaign that’s Facebook now I’m lost campaign myself against Facebook in 2009 and you might remember that somebody posted a poll on Facebook and it asked should President Obama be assassinated and Facebook left that survey online and throughout the week and then Monday maybe even Newsday took that survey oh so what I did as a result I emailed my friend contacts from A to Z from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe where I have my personal and my business network and I said we gotta get off of Facebook we have to show Facebook that material like that not only does belong but that it is on the border of hate speech it’s on the border of calling for a crime or inciting some type of violent negativity this was 2009 this was President Obama’s first summer and we still today we’re on Facebook the the management is not making the right decisions to to what do we say to curate what is posted that has to stop now that’s it final I’ll close with this though just some of that answer I created a program and it’s called listen to others but it’s just an exchange it’s a framing in dialogues helps buddy who’s not affected by a particular issue will decide to actively listen to somebody else’s story somebody who has a different experience and can explain why she feels a certain way or lives a certain way or makes a certain decision but unless we listen to others we’re not going to know we will encounter Pete and we will assume we know we don’t know and so me Mike what else remedies instead of having to engage and boy cast why don’t we start to understand why don’t we take steps to understand and then we can all get along better which actually leads me to my last question so are you familiar with the documentary where to invade next I’ve heard of it but in France I have not yet been able to find it I can’t I can’t watch it online in France but I do know about it yeah I know my sisters they always used some types of proxies so they couldn’t see there is a lot of okay it seems like we have more freedoms here with what we have access to as far as information but if you do get accent I don’t want to talk about proxies and all that they get taken down but I did like how you were talking about from a global community standpoint and it’s a tongue-in-cheek documentary by Michael Moore and he highlights you know where to invade next and it was tongue-in-cheek as to what are we taking from other countries to make America great again type of deal and so he looked at places like Paris he looked at places like Italy looked across Europe and some I think in the Caribbean as well as far as quality of life and overall well-being across cultures and so it was really good you know we were highlighting Rosa Parks but if we look at from a global community and like you said listen to others everyone really appreciates when they feel that they have a voice that is being listened to and then we could probably grow exponentially from that as opposed to being distracted by distractions that are unless pitted against each other okay you’re right yes we are in total agreement on that yes we don’t have to have factions when we have understanding we won’t have as many of these factions that we do have so I lied about that last question I was just one last one closing I’d like for you though because we uncovered a lot and it was I really appreciate the time that you spent with us and I’d like for you one to highlight your book how people can get in touch with you and all that but I also like for you to do I’m thinking of when you’re looking to get hired and you used to carry a brag book from like letters of recommendation you got from other people and such and so I’d like for you to do a little bit of a quote unquote brag book of a time line your interview Rosa Parks in 1988 and how her position was in 1988 and then we posited what would it be like if she was around in 2019 I like for you to talk a little bit about some of the other leaps and bounds that we accomplished in the last 20 plus 30 30 years and where do you see us going okay and when you say us you’re talking about the movements the ideals that I had I think there’s more ideals because like Rosa couldn’t imagine sitting with you in 1990 1988 and how far she had come and how far we globally have come since 1988 even you being in Dallas and thinking that was going to be your swan song and it’s not all these years later I would like to look at it from an ideal standpoint because I don’t think we can really foresee tactically how what happened okay well sure so did the thing just chew to start with though in 1988 when I talk to you about that lingering hug I think she did see that something was happening because if she had noticed I got out of a new car I was the driver you know I drove the car a nice four-wheel drive a trailblazer kind of thing I had expensive camera equipment with me and maybe when she saw all of the accoutrement all those things that I had at my disposal not because I need a witness because I was a person functioning in a news organization I think she did see that things were going to be better and and things gotten better I when I wake up I have to tell myself that yes my coffee cup is half full not half empty when I’m starting to drink my coffee but there’s also a mixture of how I see what has happened to our country since 1988 like okay mrs. parks developed dementia and so at the time of her death in 2005 she had she probably had no knowledge that Barack Obama it’s looking at the Democratic conviction in 2004 and she probably had no no idea that he would become president of the United States so that she probably saw media opportunities and that women of color were able to take a few steps beyond what her generation could do she may not have seen how vast the the reach or how deep the reach would go into politics but successes well let me talk about Nancy Pelosi this one kind of opened up the conversation a little bit okay when when Nancy Pelosi was elected to Congress in 1984 the only women who had been there in Congress before were either the widows of male members of Congress the wives of members of Congress who were ill when when Nancy Pelosi was elected she was elected on her career and the other part of her career is that though she grew up in Baltimore and her father was a Baltimore her brother was mayor of Baltimore Nancy Pelosi was elected my district in California that includes San Francisco so we could say that that is a milestone that that follows part of what Rosa Parks was working toward that here’s a woman who is elected and she’s elected on her own right and that was 1984 and so then what year was geraldine ferraro oh wow vice presidential nominee for the Democratic Party obviously didn’t win right so so there are there are movements for women and and not sure but in my area the news business we still have such a small percent and I don’t have the number in front of me but Oh twelve fifteen percent of news director positions at newspapers are held by women you know some very depressing numbers just minuscule numbers so media representation media management is not where it needs to be it has increased but not where it needs to be and and my interest come from everywhere but let me throw out one more kind of fact that clear in my head when I attended a broadcasting convention it was the radio and television news Directors Association national in 1989 of the 104 television stations that were being discussed there was only one African one who was the news director so that’s 1989 year after my meeting Rick the parks one african-american woman was in position of direct news organization of the 104 stations that were involved so politics is moving at a faster pace than than the media when you control the message you control the power it’s just weird listening and I do believe we live in a bubble here in Atlanta or yeah Atlanta cuz there’s too George there’s Atlanta and then there’s Georgia but here in Atlanta I mean we have black male and female newscasters from all not just sport or the weather man so I think we’re kind of used to it and then when we leave Atlanta we kind of see the numbers that you’re talking about yeah funny thing I was a sports reporter in Dallas and the Dallas Mavericks basketball team won the championship the year that I left or either the year after I left in 2009 so I was in Paris and I thought oh this is great I like the coach I like some of the players who are still there I will watch the celebration parade from my seat here in Paris when I turned on my channel KDFW Fox for that my former employer as there there there was a group of seven anchor men and women on the news set usually you have four people they had seven men and women on the news set saluting the basketball championship everyone was white we know black people dumped the basketball [Music] where all of the people of color sick so again when you control the message you control the power and so maybe that’s why the gene getting more influence from a variety of people who are listening to others maybe that’s why that is so hard to happen in the media but you know my book I do hope that my book you mentioned is called civil rights baby my story of race sports and breaking barriers in American journalism and it is exactly for what you just asked me in that last question there is just a blockage even when people have the qualifications there’s just there there are not enough opportunities where the person who presents himself or herself gifts through the the wall yep oh and one other thing I do want to talk about in the that word turn bait next they did highlight just the fact that so many students are graduating with so much debt that we’re doing beat next or if they were highlighting all these other countries that are they have their arms open for Americans to come and get their education overseas and then they can have that world for you that meet that you have Nita and that may actually change some of the perspectives as well I would one person I would think of from a sports analogy standpoint would be Kobe Bryant you know his a lot of his formative years were in Italy so you know his matriculation through the NBA was a lot different than someone that only had limited exposure outside of their city or town so we are we do want to focus globally and in that that that documentary will highlight that for you if you haven’t seen it yet yes I am going to watch I have lots of documentaries to watch this year cuz there is a lot of good work that’s been done with a lot of diversity actually in the director’s chair so I’m looking forward to that and where can they find your book well my website is Nita Wiggins calm there’s a link to the book and the book will be available through Amazon and through my publisher and my publisher is Casa Express editions and the book is imminent release though I don’t have a release date yet whoa whoa probably have to have you back on when it’s out I could do that yes I’d love it awesome well you have been in tuned to another episode of intrinsic motivation from a homies perspective Anita it was a pleasure let’s definitely stay in touch absolutely thank you for your time I enjoyed both of you thank you go Eagles [Laughter] [Music]



error: Content is protected !!