Religion And Spirituality In Contemporary Art – A Conversation With Religion And Contemporary Art [2021]

Religion And Spirituality In Contemporary Art – A Conversation With Religion And Contemporary Art [2021]
Religion And Spirituality In Contemporary Art - A Conversation With Religion And Contemporary Art
Religion And Spirituality In Contemporary Art – A Conversation With Religion And Contemporary Art

How Does Art Relate To Spirituality And Religion?

Religion and spirituality are two cornerstones of contemporary art. Both are ever present in religious paintings as they are in most other types of art. Spirituality is a subjective state of mind while religion pertains to a group of customs, beliefs, or observances shared by a particular community. Contemporary artists explore spirituality through their portrayals of God, Heaven, Buddha, Allah, and other divine beings. Many modern people have a more concrete knowledge of God through religion and spirituality in contemporary art. Some artists have a strong knowledge of religion and spirituality and use this to shape their visual art.

Art historians and critics speculate on the impact of spiritual art on popular art. They also study the impact of spiritual art in contemporary society. Art scholars have categorized spiritual paintings into two categories. First, there are works that simply depict religious ideas or themes. Second, there are works that are consciously intended as works of spirituality.

Art historians and critics also note that contemporary art has adopted many of the religious symbols and ideas of the past centuries. The crucifix, for example, has long been a common symbol for Christianity and other religious movements. In recent years, the work of Andy Warhol has popularized the hamburger and holy water image. Many other artists have followed in his footsteps and incorporated spiritual experiences and church into their art forms.

How Does Art Relate To Spirituality And Religion ?
How Does Art Relate To Spirituality And Religion?

Can The Process Of Making Art Be A Spiritual Act?

The church is no longer a monolithic institution but many people perceive it as such. It is represented by the hierarchical structure of the church – the priest on top, the church staff in suits, the congregation, who are all beneath the church canopy. Many artists have explored this concept in their work, portraying the church as a place of refuge and enlightenment. Religious paintings by contemporary artists have often used elements from the church to interpret spiritual experiences.

Religious artwork by contemporary artists can be viewed as a reaction to the increasing secularization of contemporary life. Many of these works explore the idea of spirituality and religion as an internal journey of the individual towards enlightenment and understanding. Others represent concepts of churchgoing and spiritual living. There are also works that celebrate the spirituality of specific denominations.

For many churchgoers, art forms are a powerful way to express their devotion and their values. They value the importance of art in their lives and many choose to hang church pictures or church art in their homes and churches. Some use their pieces as decorations and props in services and worship.

What is the best relationship between art and religion??
What is the relationship between art and religion?

How Can Art Express Spirituality?

Others choose not to display or show their artwork because they believe that there are many different definitions for what constitutes “religion.” There are many definitions for what is considered to be spiritual, according to many religions. There are those who define religion as something that is based on emotion, a particular set of beliefs, or a personal connection with a Higher Power. Others base their spiritual beliefs on a book of books called the Bible.

The paintings and other forms of contemporary art that have been created by churchgoers reflect this spiritual belief. They provide a way for churchgoers to express themselves and to become closer to God. It is a great way for them to get in touch with who they are. Art can speak a thousand words and can tell a story that can stir our hearts and minds. It can be an expression of pain and loss, hope, and comfort, or appreciation for a good thing.

In a time when technology has invaded every aspect of life, including churches, there is a unique opportunity to bring spiritual reflection into the lives of churchgoers. This type of art can help people feel closer to God by giving them a glimpse of who they are. It can show them who they are not and why they are being led to choose certain paths. It can give an insight into the goals of the church and how it relates to the mission of the church.

Can The Process Of Making Art Be A Spiritual Act
Can The Process Of Making Art Be A Spiritual Act?

What Is The Relationship Between Art And Religion?

This is important for churchgoers. Is the art piece that I am looking at part of an ongoing spiritual process or is it merely a work of art? Are the colors and imagery in that particular piece meaningful to me and my relationship to God? How does the work relate to the members of my church and how is it helping to enhance the spiritual relationships that we have with each other? All of these questions need to be answered before a church allows its members to have meaningful access to contemporary art.

This is not to say that contemporary art will necessarily replace spiritual practices. However, the art will surely enhance the experiences that people have with their church. It will show them that their church is a place of importance and a space where they can find meaning and purpose. In this sense, contemporary art becomes a bridge between the church and its members.

The Art of Human Spiritual Drawing

When we look into the woman’s perspective on spiritual awareness, it is interesting to see that the religious art that the woman draws with is a reflection of her inner state and not only does the art draw the human spirit, but it also allows her to experience the inner journey of her spirit through the art as well. When we look at a woman’s spiritual consciousness, we find that she has an energetic field that vibrates in many frequencies and her ability to manifest spiritual reality is highly heightened because of this. To a woman, it is as if she is experiencing the world around her through the energy that she radiates. If we place the woman’s hand in a prayer posture while looking at a sketch of a woman in meditation, the picture that comes into view may be a woman that is meditating on her inner journey of spiritual awareness, or her being aware of the spiritual energy that she is emitting from her body.

Looking into the woman’s perspective, we see that the woman draws the spiritual awareness of her physical self through her awareness of her spiritual essence and this spiritual awareness radiates out from her entire physical being. This gives us the reflection of the spiritual energy that is encompassed by the human spirit or the light that is available for everyone to embrace if they only try to look for it. In my practice, I have found that there are certain things that make art forms sacred and beneficial for the spiritual growth and awareness that each person is looking for. The religious art that a woman draws with has been a very important part of helping me learn these sacred truths.

The art of this type is not easy for anyone to master, but the benefits that are available to anyone who seeks to experience this art form are life changing. When a woman masters the art of spiritual drawing, she can experience the deepest rewards of her human spirit. I call this spiritual drawing “seeing your spiritual self.” As a spiritual being, we always need to know who we are as individuals and as a whole. What better way to find out who we are than to put a name to our individual qualities and experience all the rewards that accompany our human spirit on the inside and outside? I believe that the art of spiritual drawing can help you achieve this goal.

Do you know what is the spiritual function of art?
What is the spiritual function of art?

The Difference Between Western Art and Modern Art

One of the most common arguments I hear when it comes to determining the difference between western art and modern art is the difference between Western art being more ‘immersive’ in its presentation of reality, and Modern art, as being, well, ‘modern’. The common sense answer to this argument would be that modern art is more ‘realistic’; and this is true. However, the more I researched this debate, the more I realized that while this was indeed the case (the ‘realism’ part), what was not true was the ‘immersion’ element of the art-form. Modern art, in my opinion, is truly more of an aesthetic experience than a representation of the world.

This difference became especially clear to me when I was reviewing a series of paintings by Luc Delany, whose work I had enjoyed earlier in my life. I couldn’t help but notice that while all of Delany’s paintings showed elements of reality in them, the depth of that reality was much more profound than the surface-level representational quality of most Western art. The depth, dimension, and richness of Delany’s work became most readily apparent when comparing these paintings with works by other artists, such as those by impressionists such as Edvard Munch and Olympia Vitruvian.

In my opinion, there is no simple answer to the question posed in this article. Because of the different artistic approaches used by the masters, as well as the differences in style, one could argue that all of these forms of art could be classified as modern art. But then, again, what is truly modern art? For me, modern art is art that motivates me to achieve my personal objectives, such as a healthy mind and body, happiness, creativity, and freedom. It is the work of an artist who believes in the power of human imagination, and who tries to give meaning to his life.

Do You Know Exactly How Can Art Express Spirituality?
How Can Art Express Spirituality?

Questions of Life by Nick Gumbel – A Look at Questions of Life and Death

In this comprehensive, accessible classic, renowned author, and poet Nick Gumbel tackles some of life’s foundational questions. Questions of Life delves deep into what it means to be human, to pursue God, to become reconciled with ourselves and others, to love and to be loved. Through memorable illustrations and memorable conversations, this classic question of life helps us to transform our understanding of life through insightful introspection. Questions of Life will challenge you to examine deeply the basic assumptions we have about our ultimate purpose and destiny, about who we are, and about what’s really important. Questions of Life will help you to make sense of what’s going on in your own life and to discover how art can help you make sense of the world.

From “Why am I here? To “What is next?” in this masterpiece, internationally bestselling author, Nick Gumbel asks some of America’s most fundamental questions: What is it that matters most in the big picture; What is life teaching me about myself; Why am I writing this book? Answers to these few questions are revealed through the text, illustrations, and personal anecdotes of Mr. Gumbel. A refreshing look at life through the lens of a gifted author, this is an inspiring, encouraging, and occasionally controversial text for any reader. Questions of Life will challenge you to examine deeply the basic assumptions we have about ourselves, about life, and about what is really important.

Mr. Gumbel’s wide-ranging discussions of life, art, and history in general, and his examinations of such topics as why people act the way they do, why they get sick, and how bad things can get in life (how many times has someone warned you about the end of the world but didn’t tell you why), gives us a glimpse into the psyche. Questions of Life, Questions of Death, and Questions of Paradise is both entertaining and thought provoking. In short, this is not your run of the mill children’s book, but a very serious one at that. The author was raised in a very Christian home and has always remained actively involved in spiritual and religious affairs, though he was not particularly religious when he was growing up. His writing is both insightful and inspirational.

What Are Some Easy Small Canvas Painting Ideas For Beginners?
Easy Small Canvas Painting Ideas For Beginners

Interpretations of Spirituality And The Mental Health Benefit Of Meditation

A few decades back, before the advent of the Internet, interpretations of spirituality and other types of virtue art were often discussed in major art galleries across the country. Nowadays, abstract art has become more mainstream, and many people consider it to have an effect on their mental health. The Internet has allowed for a much wider exposure to abstract art, and artists such as Frank Stella have used it to express their strong Christian faith, or show their solidarity with political causes they believe in. But critics say that this type of art, even if it is not intended to have any religious overtones, can be used to promote certain beliefs, even though those beliefs may be distorted by the artist. The fact remains that many people are sensitive about the topic of spirituality and its connection to mental health, and that is why the popularity of these works of art continues to grow.

When discussing the connection between spirituality and mental health, it’s important to note that there is more than one type of presentness. There are people who follow religious traditions, but do not necessarily practice all the rituals associated with their religion as it stands. Similarly, there are people who do not believe in organized religion, yet participate in regular spiritual practices including meditation, yoga, and prayer. In fact, meditation has been shown to benefit all aspects of the patient’s life – from his physical health to his spiritual health.

But overall, spirituality and meditation are good for the mind and the body. In fact, experts agree that meditation is the best way to achieve both physical and mental health benefits. Through meditation, the mind and the body can relax, and release negative energy, negative emotions, and stress. However, there are people who engage in spiritual practice and meditation who still find that they need to participate in traditional religious practices. For these people, meditation is simply a good method for good health, regardless of whether it is performed with a group or alone.

Commentary: St. Louisans Can Still Enjoy Museums Large And Small During The Pandemic – St. Louis Public Radio (news.stlpublicradio.org)

Summary:

  • The World Chess Hall of Fame is located across the street from the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis in the city’s Central West End neighborhood.
  • It displays artifacts from the museum’s permanent collection and temporary exhibitions highlighting the great players, historic games and rich cultural history of chess, as well as the U.S. and World Chess Hall of Fame.
  • The exhibition includes a never-before-seen private collection of Haring’s works and photographs of the artist, bespoke street art, chess sets from London and newly commissioned pieces by St. Louis artists.
  • The Campbell House Museum, built in 1851, the first house in the elegant Lucas Place neighborhood, was the home of renowned fur trader and entrepreneur Robert Campbell and his family from 1854 until 1938.The museum contains hundreds of original Campbell possessions including furniture, paintings, clothing, letters, carriages and a unique set of interior photographs taken in the mid 1880’s.
  • The Field House Museum was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2007.

Spirituality Has Long Been Erased From Art History. Here’s Why It’s Having a Resurgence Today – artnet News (news.artnet.com)

Summary:

  • In her 2014 book, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art , Charlene Spretnak expands on the ideas in Tuchman’s “The Spiritual in Art” exhibition, taking it beyond abstraction to suggest the spiritual underpinnings of a wide swath of modern and contemporary artists.
  • Spretnak argues that spirituality is at the heart of the established canon and that mystical and occult ideas run through the works of artists as diverse as Kandinsky, Malevich, Mondrian, Beckman, Miró, Dove, and Klee.
  • Hilma af Klint, for example, was an established and recognized member of the Swedish art community.
  • In a round-table discussion published in the exhibition catalogue, a group of eminent writers, artists, and curators debate questions about af Klint’s intentionality, the authorship of works produced under the influence of a spirit guide, and whether a painting that is a diagram of a higher reality qualifies as an abstraction.
  • Once again, a search for alternatives has manifested itself in a surge of interest in spiritual and spiritualist concerns.
Can The Process Of Making Art Be A Spiritual Act?

Bridging The Material & Mystical To Awaken Spiritual Realism With Jacqueline Claire [Interview]

…”Though I drew incessantly as a child (reams and reams of paper!) I actually resisted the idea of being an “artist” most of my life. Maybe it goes back to the idea of feeling out of the loop – that somehow I wasn’t a “real” artist? Or perhaps it had to do with cultural stereotypes of artists necessarily being eccentric and anti-social? Regardless, returning to visual art has been a joyful homecoming.

I was born and raised in San Antonio, Texas and spent ten precious years in Austin. I have also lived in New Orleans and Shreveport, LA, Asheville, NC, rural Florida and Tennessee, as well as Simi Valley, a suburb outside of Los Angeles, CA. From adolescents until quite recently acting was my primary creative focus. My family is very creative (our black sheep would be someone with a “normal” job!) My mom is a painter – my inspiration and mentor. I’m blessed to have grown up around her work! And to know first hand the challenges of art as a profession.”

00:02

Good morning. Good evening. Good afternoon, everybody out there in podcast land, you are in tune to another episode of Intrinsic Motivation from a Homie’s Perspective. This is Hamza and I’m excited about our guest today because we are going to bridge the material and mystical to awakened joyful courage. What does that mean? We are going to unravel what spiritual realism is from the viewpoint of a spiritual artist. But as a spiritual artist, I think we’ll know more from our guests today. It’s Jackie Claire, from Jacqueline Claire art.com. And we’re gonna talk about living a cohesive life. So without further ado, I’d like to welcome Jackie to the podcast. Welcome, Jackie.

00:49

Thank you so much for having me on.

00:52

Yes, yes, I’m really excited speaking with you, because art is so huge, so instrumental, and artists, so different, depending on a person’s perspective. And so since you live and breathe, that, I was just really happy to have you on the podcast today.

01:11

Thank you. Yeah, I’m glad to be here. And I do think that art has a lot to teach us and to help awaken you know, in our individual lives.

01:22

Mm hmm. And before we dive into that, we just here in the States, we just celebrated Thanksgiving. So with that out of the way, I’d like to ask you if there were two things in 2020, that you are thankful for.

01:39

Yeah, so many things, it’s definitely been a year to highlight, you know, everything that is true and real and close to our hearts. And, for me, the first two things that come to mind, I’m grateful for my, like, gosh, I’m I feel it, I’m thinking, How do I say this, like, the hands, the spiritual hands, which hold me in this life, like, I just felt very protected and loved just the beauty of where I am and my family nearby and stuff. So I’ve just, I’ve felt this very wholesome sense of spiritual support that I think in other years, I’ve been more distracted, and not really, you know, paid attention to that. And then also grateful that I had the time and the focus to finish my spiritually empowering children’s book called noble being, which has been burning in my heart for years and kind of worked on it piecemeal, but this year, finally, it was like, Okay, this, this is my task, and I completed it. So that’s thanks. It’s like my COVID. Baby. That’s what I say.

02:58

I want to stay there for a second because you said it took a bit, baby. And yeah, weirdly, when there is a huge universal change, like 911, or something related, everyone kind of goes back and resets and reevalues. And so you at that time, you had 911 babies nine months later. And then, you know, I remember when prince had transitioned there. Nine months later, there were some baby prints babies, which is kind of funny. And that was this year

03:31

grieving the loss of friends.

03:34

What was that point? Yummy, it’s just yeah, range of emotion. But this year is different, because COVID is ongoing. And based on their prediction, experts are projecting that less than half a billion babies will be born in the next following year, because of COVID. And they’re not going to have children. And so you have your book done now, but I want to get your take on everyone’s thought process of holding off on having babies at this time.

04:12

I actually hadn’t heard that. I mean, I haven’t really been following, you know, the birth news. But I understand that like, I mean, that makes sense from one perspective, that maybe people aren’t meeting people or they’re not getting married. Or it’s just too uncertain of the time and hospitals and all that stuff. But on the other hand, it seems like what else is there to do? And if you’re stuck at home and all that stuff, I mean, I totally understand it that people would choose to hold off for a time that feels less uncertain. But on the other hand, I certainly hope people don’t hold back from living their lives fully as much as they can under the circumstances.

05:00

right because with the spiritual realism, and we’ll get into that, but a lot of it is having faith in the unseen. So, like you said, this year you had you felt the protection and support. It may have not been physical or was it? How did you come to the conclusion that you had the protection and support this year more than others?

05:23

Well, being home and I happen to live in a really beautiful spot, I’m on the river in a little town in Texas called New Braunfels. And, you know, I’ve just, you know, it’s been one of those years where you have to appreciate the simple things. And though I live in a, I think, strikingly beautiful place, like to look out the window and just deeply appreciate it is an essence of simple things. And I also share an art studio with my mom. So it’s been great to have, you know, friendship and family very close by. So those, those are some of the like, actual practical things. And then, and then it’s just been a spiritual 10th as well.

06:09

And you were raised, I believe, in Texas. And so you had mentioned 10 years in Austin, and you’re still in Texas. So I wanted to get your take on the mass exodus from other states like California, to states like Texas. Are you seeing a big change there?

06:31

Yeah. It’s so funny. Yeah, there was a TV show a few years ago, and there were some characters from Austin in the show. And like in scripted, and somebody says, like, oh, you’re from Texas? And they’re like, No, no, we’re from Austin. Funny, Austin is very much like this. It was funny. You said, I, Jackie grew up in Texas, and he lived in Austin, these are both true. And Austin is in Texas. But I’ve also lived in California and stuff myself. So it’s kind of funny actually moved back to Texas, in 2017, from California, so I both like native Texan, and California and interloper. Um, you know, gosh, I mean, everywhere I’ve ever lived or traveled, there’s something I’ve really loved about the place. So, you know, the environment and the people. So I love California. But, I do. I do see, like, personally, Austin has become sort of the commoditized version of what it was when I lived there back in, like, starting in 2014. Like, it’s kind of a paved paradise and put up a perfect Disneyland replica that you have to pay to get into. And, and I think that happens when places very quickly become sort of marked as like a cool spot or hotspot or a good place to be. And then you have this like, tons of like money pouring into it. And like, which is not bad, I want every economy to thrive, but where it kind of robs that of this intrinsic spirit, and it becomes just the super posh polished version of it. So I have seen that happen a bit. And I personally don’t like it to be very, to be very honest with you. But I also understand why, especially right now, people would want to leave places that are superduper, restricted and stuff.

08:47

Mm hmm. And as you were talking, I’m a surfer or you know, on the weekends, but it reminded me of Costa Rica. And it’s kind of that same sentiment where it was, you know, once a hidden treasure, but now it’s like you said it’s been commoditized. And so it’s kind of lost a little bit of its luster there. And it seems like we love something when it’s a hidden gem, but then when it becomes commercial, then it’s time to leave.

09:22

I do relate to that. I really do.

09:26

Yeah, it’s especially as an artist because you I don’t want to put words in your mouth, but for feeling art in all the places that you’ve gone. I was just reading some a little bit about you. And you were saying you were inspired. One of the places that you were inspired was New Orleans. And so I wanted to talk about a little bit of what was life like in New Orleans. Why would that a pivotal point. And was that the the part where you decided that hey, I’m going to be true and living artists.

10:00

Question. So I moved there in 2010. And it was right after the Gulf oil spill. So it was an interesting time to be there kind of certain similarities to what we’ve all felt this year where it was like this collective sense of like, waiting for other shoe to drop, or like, How bad is this going to get, you know, what’s happening and, and at the time, my main, artistic and professional focus is actually acting, Louisiana often on has had a really vibrant film game. But I moved there with my mom. And one of the things that we did, to just like help make ends meet, we were doing eco friendly murals, in people’s homes and in businesses. So house paint that doesn’t have chemicals in it. So it kind of aligned with, you know, people’s growing concerns during the Gulf oil spill. And, you know, my mom is an artist, most people in my family are very creative. I’ve always grown up around it. But, but so I was doing that, like I was working with her just because it was practical. And it was fun. And it was something we could do, we could offer to the community there. But I didn’t really realize at the time that I was really sort of laying a foundation for what would be my future art career as a painter, you know, so that really was pivotal, pivotal. I just wasn’t fully aware of it at the time. And I think life is like that a lot like hindsight is 2020. You know,

11:46

It is so weird, especially this year, because everyone has a 2020 vision. And usually when you look back, you’re like, Oh, that makes so much sense. But when you’re going through, you’re like, What is going on? And yeah, they are known in New Orleans for having a spiritual community. So were you a part of both communities? Or were they? It was a great interaction between the art community and the spiritual community.

12:16

Yeah, it is a place with a whole lot of soul. And you definitely feel that I mean, I think anyone who’s walked anywhere in New Orleans knows that. You know, I’m a member of the behind faith. And so like, I do have a, you know, very intimate, spiritual community kind of wherever I go, there were highs in New Orleans. And that was one of the reasons why I moved there. You know, to have a spiritual community, it’s really to have a sense of family everywhere, even if you’ve not met the people in person before. But, you know, I, I felt that they are New Orleans and feel very integrated into light, the spirit of culture. But I’ve found places like Santa Fe, the arts are more directly tied with a sense of spirituality. And they’re related, but they’re a little different. So I never really thought of the Arts in New Orleans, as particularly spiritual but more like spirits head, you know? Okay.

13:28

Yeah, the reason why I was asking, because looking at your site, and some of your paintings, there are a lot of moon focuses So, or there’s a huge focus on the moon. And I wanted to know the reason for that. It’s

13:46

such a good question. I love the moon on so many levels, it does have this, to me, anyway, it does have this sense of feminine energy, there’s this, this quiet, enveloping glow to it. And there’s this sense of being watched and protected, and the moon sort of helped me remember whatever I’m going through in my life right now, or whatever the world is going through right now in 2020. You know, the moon has been there looking, watching down on us for centuries, and has seen so much, you know, trial and travail and joy and celebration, like it seems so much and it kind of helps put things in perspective. And it’s also that wonderful reminder, like, you know, the seasons and everything, but the cycle is the moon is shorter than the seasons that you know, that sense of things changing but also kind of following a certain rhythm and staying the same at the same time. You know, it’s a paradox, but it’s true, you know. So it’s, for me, it’s just a good reminder of kind of like writing the course of life. But I’m always open for the symbols in my paintings, meaning something else to other people, you know, but that’s what it means to me.

15:21

Mm hmm. And, and keeping with your art, the trees, and they seem to be leaning towards the moon. And I thought it was really interesting, because usually trees lean towards the sun. And so I didn’t know if there was that juxtaposition there. Or it just so happened that all the trees are leaning to the moon, in your, in your images.

15:47

Yeah, a lot of these things are not intentional. And it’s very funny, because, you know, people be like, wow, you know, why are your moons almost always on, you know, the right side, you know, and it’s like, heck, if I know, I didn’t even realize that you tell me. Um, but I also love trees, that to me, they also have that sort of still wise energy of nature and they’re, you know, grounded, they’re rooted, but they’re reaching towards the sky. And often, to me, they look like they’re in suspended motion, you know, II trees have a wonderful sense of movement, even if they’re completely still. And just all of those elements are bringing me a great sense of peace, you know, you know, we there’s like modern art and contemporary art. And I’ve sort of jested lace thought, you know, well, I wouldn’t call my work, present art, like it is a call for you to take a breath, and be present in the moment. And all of those symbols of nature really helped do that for me.

17:08

This year, as you were talking about the simplicity, I wanted to get your take for, for me, to give you a little background. That was around the end of March, early April. And I started seeing the global I guess what global phenomenon where people were sharing photos of, or videos of animals coming into the city, like lions running through the city or animals you don’t normally see. And it was a reminder of, or a humbling reminder, that as high and mighty as we think we are, if we’re not even here, the Earth is still going to be okay. And I wanted to get your take if you notice that as well. And does that reflect any of your future? images?

17:59

Wow, that’s so interesting, man. I haven’t seen the lion running through a city. That’s too scary. Um, yeah, I mean, for sure. I think the earth is probably much older than we currently are calculating, and it’s my personal feeling and belief. And I definitely think that, you know, the earth is full of life, some that will triumph over, you know, whatever mask we humans might make of it. But I think that we humans have a great capacity that we have not fulfilled yet we have not tapped into, but to really be a binding force to bring all of these elements into harmony, you know, that it isn’t sort of us against nature, but that there’s a way that we can learn to work with nature and natural rhythms to enhance the health and beauty of the earth and enhance the quality of our communities and our lives. So, I am still rooting for us to mature as a species and fulfill this destiny. I think, if Earth slate was wiped clean of humans, it would be like too bad. You know, like I’d like I’d like to see us fulfill what I think we’re, we’re meant to as a species, which is the upliftment of the world not the conquering of the world.

19:35

Absolutely. And when you were talking about New Orleans, and I was kind of fishing for inspiration, and in some of those inspiration, inspirational people that you had highlighted were what I always call my favorite language teacher in high school. And that would be What’s her name? Carolyn Myss, and then another person that you had highlighted was Marianne Williamson and I, you in your art and your spiritual realism, you’re bridging the material mystical. So I wanted you to kind of go what you were just saying about hopefully we’re still here. What would you say, as an artist, that we can coexist with nature and still appease big business? Because that seems where the biggest disconnect is? Mm hmm. Yeah.

20:31

So what am I? Gosh, that’s a great question. You know, if I believe that the only way to create sustainable change in the world for the better, it’s not going to be like policy. First, it’s going to have to be a change in the heart of people. And the best, even ways to, you know, help children develop a sense of a moral compass and concern for the earth and other people. But sometimes grownups Can, can transform as well. But I think when people are put truthfulness, and being, you know, having integrity, above, you know, a need to boost their ego or have, you know, the fattest bottom line, or whatever it is, that seems to lead people to disregard the earth or the well being of other people. When that is changed, when people then want to make the world a better place. Well, then we can pursue business and art and advancement in a way that is, we’re always using our intelligence in our capacity to search for the solutions that are going to serve the higher. Good. So I think I’m giving you kind of an abstract answer, but it just, it starts with a spiritual and moral change in the hearts of people. And then we won’t have to, like, you know, regulate so much, because there will be an intrinsic motivation for people to, to, you know, use their interest, again, whether it’s building business, and people have a great talent for that, if that’s not a stem, that’s a talent, you know, if it’s directed in the right way, or people who, you know, can help bring people together educate children, or our scientists or doctors, like all of these things can be applied to the betterment of the whole when, when that’s the main motivation and not ego and greed.

23:01

Hmm, absolutely. And when you talk about this year, and how you’ve had that sense of support and protection, it gave you a sense of confidence, and you maybe were more empowered. And it seems like for other people I’ve interviewed or just talked to outside the podcast, that’s where they find their sense of confidence and grounding. How does that contrast with ongoing news that is more fear based? And do you think there’s a way that we could reach that feeling of protection and grounding, when we’re constantly being fed a diet of fear?

23:40

Mm hmm. Yeah, that’s a good question. And that’s a good way to put it a diet of fear. I definitely believe in being informed to the extent that feels relevant or necessary to you, I’ve sort of found this year that like, if I’m following events of the world, like minute by minute, it’s very stressful. And sometimes, you know, it takes, you know, 36 hours or a week or whatever, for like, the dust to settle. And you actually, like, kind of know what happened or how this is unfolding. So for one, I don’t think we need to be plugged in all of the time. You know, it’s like, if you were baking a cake, and you had like a sports announcer giving you a second by second, you know, well, now it’s just a bunch of glue. And this doesn’t look too good. Yeah, I mean, it’s like, just chill out. Just let the cake bake. All right, you know, that was lovely, good. So I also think that, you know, another one of my inspirations is Clarissa pinkola. Estes, and she wrote about women who run with the wolves too, it was like a big book in the late 90s and I I was exposed to her as a kid. And she talked about television being like a sewage system that we have plugged into our living rooms and, and she used the SH t word she was like, we’re literally like having this stuff, like pumped into our rooms and our living rooms. And that made a really big impression on me. And, you know, I’ve been involved in the media and you know, it’s certainly not all bad. But it’s nice to have a healthy dose of that to like, remember, you know, this isn’t all wholesome. This isn’t all good. And it’s certainly not always truthful, moral, ethical, meant to serve my highest good, sometimes they’re trying to sell a pharmaceutical, you know, like, so it’s just good to keep that in mind. And another thing going in a totally different direction that I have found to be very powerful. If you are a person of prayer to any capacity, even if it’s very informal, a prayer that I have found is like rocked my world so many times, is just to ask, to have fear removed, like just, I ask, you know, like, please take away my fear, the fears that hold me back to fears that are false. And also, please show me, what is the reality of this situation? You know, like, whatever that situation may be, but like to be able to discern what’s true. And also ask that you be able to handle it too. Because sometimes it’s like, kind of like, oh, why did I Why did I ask this. But it’s always better to feel like you’re seeing clearly even if it’s, you know, hard.

26:59

It’s really funny to watch. People always say, cancel, cancel, or forget, forget, because they realize how powerful those words are, like, I didn’t really mean it.

27:11

True, our words are so powerful. Be careful what you wish for, right?

27:17

Mm hmm.

27:18

Because Be mindful about what you wish for?

27:23

Well, it doesn’t seem like it all the time. But one of the biggest things is that the Creator has the greatest sense of humor. And for if you want to make the creator laugh, make plans. So I like for you to give a specific example. That’d be great. If not, that’s also fine. But the specific example of Oh, yeah, the creator has a sense of humor. But I have this deadline for Canvas that I need to design. But I am not getting any inspiration whatsoever. So have you ever had to force something where you’re used to just allowing it to happen? But the

28:12

the creator does have a great sense of humor, I do get that. And usually if it’s not aligned with the irises humor, man, I bet you get a great kick out of this right now. Um, you know, the way I work, I work in a lot of layers, and I use techniques that just helped get me going. So I have run late on deadlines before, but I don’t usually suffer from like a painter’s block, because I, I can trust enough to just get started. And usually the painting will guide me. So. So that really eliminates the, you know, sort of the How to where do I even start, you know, because, because I start by just starting, and then something always evolves. Fortunately.

29:09

The other side is that you’re, you’re doing canvases for adults, but you also do children’s illustration. So I wanted to know if there has ever been an instance where you were working on a canvas, and you had inspiration to do that, but nothing came through but illustrations for children?

29:31

No, no, they’re pretty distinct different art forms. though. I do sometimes like so all of my children’s illustrations start by hand just pencil on paper. And then most of the time, I then take in digitally color, and sometimes there’s like a little moment of disconnected reality going on in the paintings. UDL, and I’m like, Oh, I can’t just like, you know, I can’t just delete, I can’t choose like, you know, undo what I just did, or I can’t just like drag and drop a color. You know, it’s like it, you know, I get sort of spoiled in the digital world and then versus the, you know, the painting world. But yeah, I haven’t struggled with, with kind of, you know, having the wires crossed otherwise.

30:31

Okay. No, just thought I’d ask. Because the other side of that, since you were bringing up the digital side. And in a previous life, I worked at an architecture firm. And before working there, I’d never seen any, being any human being walk up to a building and kind of just, in a way caress it, like they would just, especially if they designed it, right, there’s that there’s that connection. And I know with your art, or at least pre COVID. And you do a lot of interaction or you encourage interaction with your art. So I wanted to know, do you feel that way with Are these all personal? Like, from your essence, this is my personal art in how do you deal with that interaction now that we have to socially distance?

31:23

Mm hmm. Yeah. Right before COVID. I did have live exhibits, right, integrated storytelling, spiritual storytelling, and facilitated conversation and stuff with the artwork, and we use the artwork, not so much tactile, sometimes, I guess people would touch it. But more so just as a visual jumping off point to explore different spiritual topics. And the art is great for helping elicit personal associations and that sort of thing to help people think more with their heart than just like, think intellectually, and you know, what, what am I supposed to say right now, but kind of have their own insights. You know, I have a really unique relationship with the artwork that I am privileged to create. It’s not at all trippy. Like my process is not like I light incense and go into a trance, like, it’s very much. I’m showing up for work, and I get tired. And sometimes I get frustrated, like, it’s definitely me showing up to do the labor. But I, the paintings always win, like they never let me just impose my will on them. They always ultimately make me surrender if that’s what I have to do. And they end up becoming what I think they were meant to be. And I sort of see it more like, I’m sort of like a carpenter carving out these windows into some vision that we then all get to look at, but it’s not me. constructing the vision, I’m just sort of making the portal. And as such, when a piece is done, even though it’s like, I’ve been wanting it to be done, you’re like, Oh, I just you know, I want to finish this piece whenever. Once it is I I don’t really feel like it’s mine. Like it’s the funniest thing, but I oftentimes, like don’t even really have clear memories of even working on the piece even though, like my mom will remind me like, Oh, yeah, you had a freakout when that, you know, technique went wrong or something. And I’m like, Oh, yeah, I did. But yeah, once they’re done, I’m like, oh, wow, that’s cool. Like, who made that? That’s me. And I mentioned starting to feel that way with my book, even though my children’s illustrations are a little bit more like my specific vision rather than each opening up. But it’s starting to feel like it’s, it’s this thing that belongs to the world now and I was privileged to spend that time with it. But it’s, it’s like once my babies are grown, they’re grown.

34:29

I think you just highlighted a perfect example of CO creating. And when you have that co-creation it seems like it ‘s when there’s no accident, and it comes out the way it’s supposed to turn out. And I wanted to ask if that was a bigger picture of your life. I mean, I remember where I don’t remember I wasn’t there but just reading with. We’ve known each other a previous log maybe, but in midlife You had the reams of paper you were always drawing and then you were like us, you had the felt like you distance yourself from being an artist in you were had the acting bug, but it seems like you have gone back to the art or do you marry the art and the acting together?

35:18

Hmm. Well, they have found each other, which is pretty neat. When I transition to art back in 1718 2017 2018. I didn’t really think I would go back to asking, but I can have worked its way in with my, my live shows, you know, BC before COVID, and my public speaking and stuff. So it has worked its way in, which is really cool. Yeah, again, it’s kind of how life kind of comes together. You just keep taking one step forward. And, and the pieces sort of find each other. But, you know, we didn’t have an official marriage ceremony?

36:07

Sure, it would be, I’m gonna use that to that bc before COVID. It didn’t feel like there was the spiritual accelerant. And so Oh, yeah, it’ll happen. And it may have been a lifelong dream. And it was at the back burner for 1015 years, family career, what have you. But 2020 is the accelerant. Right? And so what would you say to someone that has had the ream of paper when they were their child, but now it feels like, quote unquote, real life is in the way, but a part of them is missing? How would they make that leap into doing what they love?

36:48

As an artist, my God, yeah. Wow, it’s kind of cliche. But it really is a matter of just making the decision. Like when, when it’s like, oh, one day, I want to write a book, you know, I get it. I was there. I’ve been there one day, it’s going to come together. Well, 2020 was a reminder that today is the day because tomorrow could look very different. Like we have no idea what tomorrow is gonna bring. And it’s always been that way, but it’s become very obvious this year. So like, when I finally decided, Okay, I’m, I’m going to finish my book, I gave myself two months, I was like, Okay, next two months, and cleaning the slate, and I’m gonna finish this book. And of course, it took a lot longer than two months. But I was already knee deep in them. So I just had to keep going. So someone may not be able to commit to a chunk of time like that. But I think you could find what feels authentic and work for you like, Okay, I’m going to, you know, by next month, I’m going to have a studio space set up, or I’m going to sign up for an online class or something. Because, though it is true, that life has this magical element and things do, you know, evolve in ways that you don’t expect, when there’s something that’s in your heart, that is your responsibility, and you have to honor it, and you have to be the one to make it happen. And then the news will come in and play and it’ll, it’ll evolve and be something even cooler and better than what you could have done on your own. But you have to show up first.

38:47

Mm hmm. And show up you did because I believe before we started recording, you were telling me about the upcoming deadlines for your book. And I like for you to talk about that.

39:00

Absolutely. So my children’s book, noble beings, spiritual handbook for children of all ages, which of course includes all of us because we all were children once and have an inner child within us and we never outgrow our need for spiritual guidance. It’s an illustrated book with 39 quotes from the Baha’i writings on topics like our spiritual nature, like who we truly are and how to live, how to treat others and how to pray. So this book noble beings, I released it for pre-sales last month, and the final day to order is December 8, for these first edition signed hardback books, so yes, if anyone is inspired or intrigued, I do hope they check out noble beings and December 8 at 11:59pm Central Time. Standard Time is the deadline to order.

40:04

It sounds like I mean, that is the art world, right? You don’t want one of few, not one of 3000 mass produced. So after this deadline, will the book go away? Or will it have that mass production in the future?

40:19

Right? So it’s all self published. And it’s made in the US by a company that’s in California and Utah. So I’m doing it all myself. And all I can guarantee is this first run. It’s only 500 books. I do hope to offer this in the future. But I make no promises. I don’t know exactly when or how or whatever. So people have moved, I would encourage them to get it now. If you know, and it’s true what you say about art, the book, I think, holds keys, for what we were talking about earlier about, like how to actually transform the world and make it a better place, like, I truly think that it can impact people. So I would like it to, you know, sell a gazillion million copies. But until maybe I partner with you know, a publisher or something, I don’t know if that’s possible. So right now, it’s just it’s just, you know, a small scale thing. And so that’s why I did the Indiegogo version for selling at

41:34

no problem. And in addition to that, if people love moons and other inspired art that was created about from you, you are co created by you and your co creative, higher energies. How can they get in touch with you? Yeah, of course. How could they get in touch with you to learn more information?

41:56

Yes, well, I would love it for them to get in touch with me. My name is Jacqueline Claire, and everything spelled the traditional way. And my website, and my Instagram and Facebook handles are all Jacqueline Claire art. So Jacqueline Claire, art.com, Facebook, Instagram. And those are the best ways to find me and on my website, you can sign up to my email list to get some perks and behind the same thing.

42:26

Awesome. Awesome. Well, you have just been tuned to another episode of Intrinsic Motivation from a Homie’s Perspective. This is Hamza and Jackie It was a pleasure. Let’s stay in touch.

42:38

Thank you Hamza. This is great. Thanks for having me.

How Does Art Relate To Spirituality And Religion?

Religion and spirituality are two cornerstones of contemporary art. Both are ever present in religious paintings as they are in most other types of art. Spirituality is a subjective state of mind while religion pertains to a group of customs, beliefs, or observances shared by a particular community. Contemporary artists explore spirituality through their portrayals of God, Heaven, Buddha, Allah, and other divine beings. Many modern people have a more concrete knowledge of God through religion and spirituality in contemporary art. Some artists have a strong knowledge of religion and spirituality and use this to shape their visual art.

Art historians and critics speculate on the impact of spiritual art on popular art. They also study the impact of spiritual art in contemporary society. Art scholars have categorized spiritual paintings into two categories. First, there are works that simply depict religious ideas or themes. Second, there are works that are consciously intended as works of spirituality.

Art historians and critics also note that contemporary art has adopted many of the religious symbols and ideas of the past centuries. The crucifix, for example, has long been a common symbol for Christianity and other religious movements. In recent years, the work of Andy Warhol has popularized the hamburger and holy water image. Many other artists have followed in his footsteps and incorporated spiritual experiences and church into their art forms.

Can The Process Of Making Art Be A Spiritual Act?

The church is no longer a monolithic institution but many people perceive it as such. It is represented by the hierarchical structure of the church – the priest on top, the church staff in suits, the congregation, who are all beneath the church canopy. Many artists have explored this concept in their work, portraying the church as a place of refuge and enlightenment. Religious paintings by contemporary artists have often used elements from the church to interpret spiritual experiences.

Religious artwork by contemporary artists can be viewed as a reaction to the increasing secularization of contemporary life. Many of these works explore the idea of spirituality and religion as an internal journey of the individual towards enlightenment and understanding. Others represent concepts of churchgoing and spiritual living. There are also works that celebrate the spirituality of specific denominations.

For many churchgoers, art forms are a powerful way to express their devotion and their values. They value the importance of art in their lives and many choose to hang church pictures or church art in their homes and churches. Some use their pieces as decorations and props in services and worship.

How Can Art Express Spirituality?

Others choose not to display or show their artwork because they believe that there are many different definitions for what constitutes “religion.” There are many definitions for what is considered to be spiritual, according to many religions. There are those who define religion as something that is based on emotion, a particular set of beliefs, or a personal connection with a Higher Power. Others base their spiritual beliefs on a book of books called the Bible.

The paintings and other forms of contemporary art that have been created by churchgoers reflect this spiritual belief. They provide a way for churchgoers to express themselves and to become closer to God. It is a great way for them to get in touch with who they are. Art can speak a thousand words and can tell a story that can stir our hearts and minds. It can be an expression of pain and loss, hope, and comfort, or appreciation for a good thing.

In a time when technology has invaded every aspect of life, including churches, there is a unique opportunity to bring spiritual reflection into the lives of churchgoers. This type of art can help people feel closer to God by giving them a glimpse of who they are. It can show them who they are not and why they are being led to choose certain paths. It can give an insight into the goals of the church and how it relates to the mission of the church.

What Is The Relationship Between Art And Religion?

This is important for churchgoers. Is the art piece that I am looking at part of an ongoing spiritual process or is it merely a work of art? Are the colors and imagery in that particular piece meaningful to me and my relationship to God? How does the work relate to the members of my church and how is it helping to enhance the spiritual relationships that we have with each other? All of these questions need to be answered before a church allows its members to have meaningful access to contemporary art.

This is not to say that contemporary art will necessarily replace spiritual practices. However, the art will surely enhance the experiences that people have with their church. It will show them that their church is a place of importance and a space where they can find meaning and purpose. In this sense, contemporary art becomes a bridge between the church and its members.

The Art of Human Spiritual Drawing

When we look into the woman’s perspective on spiritual awareness, it is interesting to see that the religious art that the woman draws with is a reflection of her inner state and not only does the art draw the human spirit, but it also allows her to experience the inner journey of her spirit through the art as well. When we look at a woman’s spiritual consciousness, we find that she has an energetic field that vibrates in many frequencies and her ability to manifest spiritual reality is highly heightened because of this. To a woman, it is as if she is experiencing the world around her through the energy that she radiates. If we place the woman’s hand in a prayer posture while looking at a sketch of a woman in meditation, the picture that comes into view may be a woman that is meditating on her inner journey of spiritual awareness, or her being aware of the spiritual energy that she is emitting from her body.

Looking into the woman’s perspective, we see that the woman draws the spiritual awareness of her physical self through her awareness of her spiritual essence and this spiritual awareness radiates out from her entire physical being. This gives us the reflection of the spiritual energy that is encompassed by the human spirit or the light that is available for everyone to embrace if they only try to look for it. In my practice, I have found that there are certain things that make art forms sacred and beneficial for the spiritual growth and awareness that each person is looking for. The religious art that a woman draws with has been a very important part of helping me learn these sacred truths.

The art of this type is not easy for anyone to master, but the benefits that are available to anyone who seeks to experience this art form are life changing. When a woman masters the art of spiritual drawing, she can experience the deepest rewards of her human spirit. I call this spiritual drawing “seeing your spiritual self.” As a spiritual being, we always need to know who we are as individuals and as a whole. What better way to find out who we are than to put a name to our individual qualities and experience all the rewards that accompany our human spirit on the inside and outside? I believe that the art of spiritual drawing can help you achieve this goal.

The Difference Between Western Art and Modern Art

One of the most common arguments I hear when it comes to determining the difference between western art and modern art is the difference between Western art being more ‘immersive’ in its presentation of reality, and Modern art, as being, well, ‘modern’. The common sense answer to this argument would be that modern art is more ‘realistic’; and this is true. However, the more I researched this debate, the more I realized that while this was indeed the case (the ‘realism’ part), what was not true was the ‘immersion’ element of the art-form. Modern art, in my opinion, is truly more of an aesthetic experience than a representation of the world.

This difference became especially clear to me when I was reviewing a series of paintings by Luc Delany, whose work I had enjoyed earlier in my life. I couldn’t help but notice that while all of Delany’s paintings showed elements of reality in them, the depth of that reality was much more profound than the surface-level representational quality of most Western art. The depth, dimension, and richness of Delany’s work became most readily apparent when comparing these paintings with works by other artists, such as those by impressionists such as Edvard Munch and Olympia Vitruvian.

In my opinion, there is no simple answer to the question posed in this article. Because of the different artistic approaches used by the masters, as well as the differences in style, one could argue that all of these forms of art could be classified as modern art. But then, again, what is truly modern art? For me, modern art is art that motivates me to achieve my personal objectives, such as a healthy mind and body, happiness, creativity, and freedom. It is the work of an artist who believes in the power of human imagination, and who tries to give meaning to his life.

Questions of Life by Nick Gumbel – A Look at Questions of Life and Death

In this comprehensive, accessible classic, renowned author, and poet Nick Gumbel tackles some of life’s foundational questions. Questions of Life delves deep into what it means to be human, to pursue God, to become reconciled with ourselves and others, to love and to be loved. Through memorable illustrations and memorable conversations, this classic question of life helps us to transform our understanding of life through insightful introspection. Questions of Life will challenge you to examine deeply the basic assumptions we have about our ultimate purpose and destiny, about who we are, and about what’s really important. Questions of Life will help you to make sense of what’s going on in your own life and to discover how art can help you make sense of the world.

From “Why am I here? To “What is next?” in this masterpiece, internationally bestselling author, Nick Gumbel asks some of America’s most fundamental questions: What is it that matters most in the big picture; What is life teaching me about myself; Why am I writing this book? Answers to these few questions are revealed through the text, illustrations, and personal anecdotes of Mr. Gumbel. A refreshing look at life through the lens of a gifted author, this is an inspiring, encouraging, and occasionally controversial text for any reader. Questions of Life will challenge you to examine deeply the basic assumptions we have about ourselves, about life, and about what is really important.

Mr. Gumbel’s wide-ranging discussions of life, art, and history in general, and his examinations of such topics as why people act the way they do, why they get sick, and how bad things can get in life (how many times has someone warned you about the end of the world but didn’t tell you why), gives us a glimpse into the psyche. Questions of Life, Questions of Death, and Questions of Paradise is both entertaining and thought provoking. In short, this is not your run of the mill children’s book, but a very serious one at that. The author was raised in a very Christian home and has always remained actively involved in spiritual and religious affairs, though he was not particularly religious when he was growing up. His writing is both insightful and inspirational.

Interpretations of Spirituality And The Mental Health Benefit Of Meditation

A few decades back, before the advent of the Internet, interpretations of spirituality and other types of virtue art were often discussed in major art galleries across the country. Nowadays, abstract art has become more mainstream, and many people consider it to have an effect on their mental health. The Internet has allowed for a much wider exposure to abstract art, and artists such as Frank Stella have used it to express their strong Christian faith, or show their solidarity with political causes they believe in. But critics say that this type of art, even if it is not intended to have any religious overtones, can be used to promote certain beliefs, even though those beliefs may be distorted by the artist. The fact remains that many people are sensitive about the topic of spirituality and its connection to mental health, and that is why the popularity of these works of art continues to grow.

When discussing the connection between spirituality and mental health, it’s important to note that there is more than one type of presentness. There are people who follow religious traditions, but do not necessarily practice all the rituals associated with their religion as it stands. Similarly, there are people who do not believe in organized religion, yet participate in regular spiritual practices including meditation, yoga, and prayer. In fact, meditation has been shown to benefit all aspects of the patient’s life – from his physical health to his spiritual health.

But overall, spirituality and meditation are good for the mind and the body. In fact, experts agree that meditation is the best way to achieve both physical and mental health benefits. Through meditation, the mind and the body can relax, and release negative energy, negative emotions, and stress. However, there are people who engage in spiritual practice and meditation who still find that they need to participate in traditional religious practices. For these people, meditation is simply a good method for good health, regardless of whether it is performed with a group or alone.

Commentary: St. Louisans Can Still Enjoy Museums Large And Small During The Pandemic – St. Louis Public Radio (news.stlpublicradio.org)

Summary:

  • The World Chess Hall of Fame is located across the street from the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis in the city’s Central West End neighborhood.
  • It displays artifacts from the museum’s permanent collection and temporary exhibitions highlighting the great players, historic games and rich cultural history of chess, as well as the U.S. and World Chess Hall of Fame.
  • The exhibition includes a never-before-seen private collection of Haring’s works and photographs of the artist, bespoke street art, chess sets from London and newly commissioned pieces by St. Louis artists.
  • The Campbell House Museum, built in 1851, the first house in the elegant Lucas Place neighborhood, was the home of renowned fur trader and entrepreneur Robert Campbell and his family from 1854 until 1938.The museum contains hundreds of original Campbell possessions including furniture, paintings, clothing, letters, carriages and a unique set of interior photographs taken in the mid 1880’s.
  • The Field House Museum was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2007.

Spirituality Has Long Been Erased From Art History. Here’s Why It’s Having a Resurgence Today – artnet News (news.artnet.com)

Summary:

  • In her 2014 book, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art , Charlene Spretnak expands on the ideas in Tuchman’s “The Spiritual in Art” exhibition, taking it beyond abstraction to suggest the spiritual underpinnings of a wide swath of modern and contemporary artists.
  • Spretnak argues that spirituality is at the heart of the established canon and that mystical and occult ideas run through the works of artists as diverse as Kandinsky, Malevich, Mondrian, Beckman, Miró, Dove, and Klee.
  • Hilma af Klint, for example, was an established and recognized member of the Swedish art community.
  • In a round-table discussion published in the exhibition catalogue, a group of eminent writers, artists, and curators debate questions about af Klint’s intentionality, the authorship of works produced under the influence of a spirit guide, and whether a painting that is a diagram of a higher reality qualifies as an abstraction.
  • Once again, a search for alternatives has manifested itself in a surge of interest in spiritual and spiritualist concerns.

Bridging The Material & Mystical To Awaken Spiritual Realism With Jacqueline Claire [Interview]

…”Though I drew incessantly as a child (reams and reams of paper!) I actually resisted the idea of being an “artist” most of my life. Maybe it goes back to the idea of feeling out of the loop – that somehow I wasn’t a “real” artist? Or perhaps it had to do with cultural stereotypes of artists necessarily being eccentric and anti-social? Regardless, returning to visual art has been a joyful homecoming.

I was born and raised in San Antonio, Texas and spent ten precious years in Austin. I have also lived in New Orleans and Shreveport, LA, Asheville, NC, rural Florida and Tennessee, as well as Simi Valley, a suburb outside of Los Angeles, CA. From adolescents until quite recently acting was my primary creative focus. My family is very creative (our black sheep would be someone with a “normal” job!) My mom is a painter – my inspiration and mentor. I’m blessed to have grown up around her work! And to know first hand the challenges of art as a profession.”

00:02

Good morning. Good evening. Good afternoon, everybody out there in podcast land, you are in tune to another episode of Intrinsic Motivation from a Homie’s Perspective. This is Hamza and I’m excited about our guest today because we are going to bridge the material and mystical to awakened joyful courage. What does that mean? We are going to unravel what spiritual realism is from the viewpoint of a spiritual artist. But as a spiritual artist, I think we’ll know more from our guests today. It’s Jackie Claire, from Jacqueline Claire art.com. And we’re gonna talk about living a cohesive life. So without further ado, I’d like to welcome Jackie to the podcast. Welcome, Jackie.

00:49

Thank you so much for having me on.

00:52

Yes, yes, I’m really excited speaking with you, because art is so huge, so instrumental, and artists, so different, depending on a person’s perspective. And so since you live and breathe, that, I was just really happy to have you on the podcast today.

01:11

Thank you. Yeah, I’m glad to be here. And I do think that art has a lot to teach us and to help awaken you know, in our individual lives.

01:22

Mm hmm. And before we dive into that, we just here in the States, we just celebrated Thanksgiving. So with that out of the way, I’d like to ask you if there were two things in 2020, that you are thankful for.

01:39

Yeah, so many things, it’s definitely been a year to highlight, you know, everything that is true and real and close to our hearts. And, for me, the first two things that come to mind, I’m grateful for my, like, gosh, I’m I feel it, I’m thinking, How do I say this, like, the hands, the spiritual hands, which hold me in this life, like, I just felt very protected and loved just the beauty of where I am and my family nearby and stuff. So I’ve just, I’ve felt this very wholesome sense of spiritual support that I think in other years, I’ve been more distracted, and not really, you know, paid attention to that. And then also grateful that I had the time and the focus to finish my spiritually empowering children’s book called noble being, which has been burning in my heart for years and kind of worked on it piecemeal, but this year, finally, it was like, Okay, this, this is my task, and I completed it. So that’s thanks. It’s like my COVID. Baby. That’s what I say.

02:58

I want to stay there for a second because you said it took a bit, baby. And yeah, weirdly, when there is a huge universal change, like 911, or something related, everyone kind of goes back and resets and reevalues. And so you at that time, you had 911 babies nine months later. And then, you know, I remember when prince had transitioned there. Nine months later, there were some baby prints babies, which is kind of funny. And that was this year

03:31

grieving the loss of friends.

03:34

What was that point? Yummy, it’s just yeah, range of emotion. But this year is different, because COVID is ongoing. And based on their prediction, experts are projecting that less than half a billion babies will be born in the next following year, because of COVID. And they’re not going to have children. And so you have your book done now, but I want to get your take on everyone’s thought process of holding off on having babies at this time.

04:12

I actually hadn’t heard that. I mean, I haven’t really been following, you know, the birth news. But I understand that like, I mean, that makes sense from one perspective, that maybe people aren’t meeting people or they’re not getting married. Or it’s just too uncertain of the time and hospitals and all that stuff. But on the other hand, it seems like what else is there to do? And if you’re stuck at home and all that stuff, I mean, I totally understand it that people would choose to hold off for a time that feels less uncertain. But on the other hand, I certainly hope people don’t hold back from living their lives fully as much as they can under the circumstances.

05:00

right because with the spiritual realism, and we’ll get into that, but a lot of it is having faith in the unseen. So, like you said, this year you had you felt the protection and support. It may have not been physical or was it? How did you come to the conclusion that you had the protection and support this year more than others?

05:23

Well, being home and I happen to live in a really beautiful spot, I’m on the river in a little town in Texas called New Braunfels. And, you know, I’ve just, you know, it’s been one of those years where you have to appreciate the simple things. And though I live in a, I think, strikingly beautiful place, like to look out the window and just deeply appreciate it is an essence of simple things. And I also share an art studio with my mom. So it’s been great to have, you know, friendship and family very close by. So those, those are some of the like, actual practical things. And then, and then it’s just been a spiritual 10th as well.

06:09

And you were raised, I believe, in Texas. And so you had mentioned 10 years in Austin, and you’re still in Texas. So I wanted to get your take on the mass exodus from other states like California, to states like Texas. Are you seeing a big change there?

06:31

Yeah. It’s so funny. Yeah, there was a TV show a few years ago, and there were some characters from Austin in the show. And like in scripted, and somebody says, like, oh, you’re from Texas? And they’re like, No, no, we’re from Austin. Funny, Austin is very much like this. It was funny. You said, I, Jackie grew up in Texas, and he lived in Austin, these are both true. And Austin is in Texas. But I’ve also lived in California and stuff myself. So it’s kind of funny actually moved back to Texas, in 2017, from California, so I both like native Texan, and California and interloper. Um, you know, gosh, I mean, everywhere I’ve ever lived or traveled, there’s something I’ve really loved about the place. So, you know, the environment and the people. So I love California. But, I do. I do see, like, personally, Austin has become sort of the commoditized version of what it was when I lived there back in, like, starting in 2014. Like, it’s kind of a paved paradise and put up a perfect Disneyland replica that you have to pay to get into. And, and I think that happens when places very quickly become sort of marked as like a cool spot or hotspot or a good place to be. And then you have this like, tons of like money pouring into it. And like, which is not bad, I want every economy to thrive, but where it kind of robs that of this intrinsic spirit, and it becomes just the super posh polished version of it. So I have seen that happen a bit. And I personally don’t like it to be very, to be very honest with you. But I also understand why, especially right now, people would want to leave places that are superduper, restricted and stuff.

08:47

Mm hmm. And as you were talking, I’m a surfer or you know, on the weekends, but it reminded me of Costa Rica. And it’s kind of that same sentiment where it was, you know, once a hidden treasure, but now it’s like you said it’s been commoditized. And so it’s kind of lost a little bit of its luster there. And it seems like we love something when it’s a hidden gem, but then when it becomes commercial, then it’s time to leave.

09:22

I do relate to that. I really do.

09:26

Yeah, it’s especially as an artist because you I don’t want to put words in your mouth, but for feeling art in all the places that you’ve gone. I was just reading some a little bit about you. And you were saying you were inspired. One of the places that you were inspired was New Orleans. And so I wanted to talk about a little bit of what was life like in New Orleans. Why would that a pivotal point. And was that the the part where you decided that hey, I’m going to be true and living artists.

10:00

Question. So I moved there in 2010. And it was right after the Gulf oil spill. So it was an interesting time to be there kind of certain similarities to what we’ve all felt this year where it was like this collective sense of like, waiting for other shoe to drop, or like, How bad is this going to get, you know, what’s happening and, and at the time, my main, artistic and professional focus is actually acting, Louisiana often on has had a really vibrant film game. But I moved there with my mom. And one of the things that we did, to just like help make ends meet, we were doing eco friendly murals, in people’s homes and in businesses. So house paint that doesn’t have chemicals in it. So it kind of aligned with, you know, people’s growing concerns during the Gulf oil spill. And, you know, my mom is an artist, most people in my family are very creative. I’ve always grown up around it. But, but so I was doing that, like I was working with her just because it was practical. And it was fun. And it was something we could do, we could offer to the community there. But I didn’t really realize at the time that I was really sort of laying a foundation for what would be my future art career as a painter, you know, so that really was pivotal, pivotal. I just wasn’t fully aware of it at the time. And I think life is like that a lot like hindsight is 2020. You know,

11:46

It is so weird, especially this year, because everyone has a 2020 vision. And usually when you look back, you’re like, Oh, that makes so much sense. But when you’re going through, you’re like, What is going on? And yeah, they are known in New Orleans for having a spiritual community. So were you a part of both communities? Or were they? It was a great interaction between the art community and the spiritual community.

12:16

Yeah, it is a place with a whole lot of soul. And you definitely feel that I mean, I think anyone who’s walked anywhere in New Orleans knows that. You know, I’m a member of the behind faith. And so like, I do have a, you know, very intimate, spiritual community kind of wherever I go, there were highs in New Orleans. And that was one of the reasons why I moved there. You know, to have a spiritual community, it’s really to have a sense of family everywhere, even if you’ve not met the people in person before. But, you know, I, I felt that they are New Orleans and feel very integrated into light, the spirit of culture. But I’ve found places like Santa Fe, the arts are more directly tied with a sense of spirituality. And they’re related, but they’re a little different. So I never really thought of the Arts in New Orleans, as particularly spiritual but more like spirits head, you know? Okay.

13:28

Yeah, the reason why I was asking, because looking at your site, and some of your paintings, there are a lot of moon focuses So, or there’s a huge focus on the moon. And I wanted to know the reason for that. It’s

13:46

such a good question. I love the moon on so many levels, it does have this, to me, anyway, it does have this sense of feminine energy, there’s this, this quiet, enveloping glow to it. And there’s this sense of being watched and protected, and the moon sort of helped me remember whatever I’m going through in my life right now, or whatever the world is going through right now in 2020. You know, the moon has been there looking, watching down on us for centuries, and has seen so much, you know, trial and travail and joy and celebration, like it seems so much and it kind of helps put things in perspective. And it’s also that wonderful reminder, like, you know, the seasons and everything, but the cycle is the moon is shorter than the seasons that you know, that sense of things changing but also kind of following a certain rhythm and staying the same at the same time. You know, it’s a paradox, but it’s true, you know. So it’s, for me, it’s just a good reminder of kind of like writing the course of life. But I’m always open for the symbols in my paintings, meaning something else to other people, you know, but that’s what it means to me.

15:21

Mm hmm. And, and keeping with your art, the trees, and they seem to be leaning towards the moon. And I thought it was really interesting, because usually trees lean towards the sun. And so I didn’t know if there was that juxtaposition there. Or it just so happened that all the trees are leaning to the moon, in your, in your images.

15:47

Yeah, a lot of these things are not intentional. And it’s very funny, because, you know, people be like, wow, you know, why are your moons almost always on, you know, the right side, you know, and it’s like, heck, if I know, I didn’t even realize that you tell me. Um, but I also love trees, that to me, they also have that sort of still wise energy of nature and they’re, you know, grounded, they’re rooted, but they’re reaching towards the sky. And often, to me, they look like they’re in suspended motion, you know, II trees have a wonderful sense of movement, even if they’re completely still. And just all of those elements are bringing me a great sense of peace, you know, you know, we there’s like modern art and contemporary art. And I’ve sort of jested lace thought, you know, well, I wouldn’t call my work, present art, like it is a call for you to take a breath, and be present in the moment. And all of those symbols of nature really helped do that for me.

17:08

This year, as you were talking about the simplicity, I wanted to get your take for, for me, to give you a little background. That was around the end of March, early April. And I started seeing the global I guess what global phenomenon where people were sharing photos of, or videos of animals coming into the city, like lions running through the city or animals you don’t normally see. And it was a reminder of, or a humbling reminder, that as high and mighty as we think we are, if we’re not even here, the Earth is still going to be okay. And I wanted to get your take if you notice that as well. And does that reflect any of your future? images?

17:59

Wow, that’s so interesting, man. I haven’t seen the lion running through a city. That’s too scary. Um, yeah, I mean, for sure. I think the earth is probably much older than we currently are calculating, and it’s my personal feeling and belief. And I definitely think that, you know, the earth is full of life, some that will triumph over, you know, whatever mask we humans might make of it. But I think that we humans have a great capacity that we have not fulfilled yet we have not tapped into, but to really be a binding force to bring all of these elements into harmony, you know, that it isn’t sort of us against nature, but that there’s a way that we can learn to work with nature and natural rhythms to enhance the health and beauty of the earth and enhance the quality of our communities and our lives. So, I am still rooting for us to mature as a species and fulfill this destiny. I think, if Earth slate was wiped clean of humans, it would be like too bad. You know, like I’d like I’d like to see us fulfill what I think we’re, we’re meant to as a species, which is the upliftment of the world not the conquering of the world.

19:35

Absolutely. And when you were talking about New Orleans, and I was kind of fishing for inspiration, and in some of those inspiration, inspirational people that you had highlighted were what I always call my favorite language teacher in high school. And that would be What’s her name? Carolyn Myss, and then another person that you had highlighted was Marianne Williamson and I, you in your art and your spiritual realism, you’re bridging the material mystical. So I wanted you to kind of go what you were just saying about hopefully we’re still here. What would you say, as an artist, that we can coexist with nature and still appease big business? Because that seems where the biggest disconnect is? Mm hmm. Yeah.

20:31

So what am I? Gosh, that’s a great question. You know, if I believe that the only way to create sustainable change in the world for the better, it’s not going to be like policy. First, it’s going to have to be a change in the heart of people. And the best, even ways to, you know, help children develop a sense of a moral compass and concern for the earth and other people. But sometimes grownups Can, can transform as well. But I think when people are put truthfulness, and being, you know, having integrity, above, you know, a need to boost their ego or have, you know, the fattest bottom line, or whatever it is, that seems to lead people to disregard the earth or the well being of other people. When that is changed, when people then want to make the world a better place. Well, then we can pursue business and art and advancement in a way that is, we’re always using our intelligence in our capacity to search for the solutions that are going to serve the higher. Good. So I think I’m giving you kind of an abstract answer, but it just, it starts with a spiritual and moral change in the hearts of people. And then we won’t have to, like, you know, regulate so much, because there will be an intrinsic motivation for people to, to, you know, use their interest, again, whether it’s building business, and people have a great talent for that, if that’s not a stem, that’s a talent, you know, if it’s directed in the right way, or people who, you know, can help bring people together educate children, or our scientists or doctors, like all of these things can be applied to the betterment of the whole when, when that’s the main motivation and not ego and greed.

23:01

Hmm, absolutely. And when you talk about this year, and how you’ve had that sense of support and protection, it gave you a sense of confidence, and you maybe were more empowered. And it seems like for other people I’ve interviewed or just talked to outside the podcast, that’s where they find their sense of confidence and grounding. How does that contrast with ongoing news that is more fear based? And do you think there’s a way that we could reach that feeling of protection and grounding, when we’re constantly being fed a diet of fear?

23:40

Mm hmm. Yeah, that’s a good question. And that’s a good way to put it a diet of fear. I definitely believe in being informed to the extent that feels relevant or necessary to you, I’ve sort of found this year that like, if I’m following events of the world, like minute by minute, it’s very stressful. And sometimes, you know, it takes, you know, 36 hours or a week or whatever, for like, the dust to settle. And you actually, like, kind of know what happened or how this is unfolding. So for one, I don’t think we need to be plugged in all of the time. You know, it’s like, if you were baking a cake, and you had like a sports announcer giving you a second by second, you know, well, now it’s just a bunch of glue. And this doesn’t look too good. Yeah, I mean, it’s like, just chill out. Just let the cake bake. All right, you know, that was lovely, good. So I also think that, you know, another one of my inspirations is Clarissa pinkola. Estes, and she wrote about women who run with the wolves too, it was like a big book in the late 90s and I I was exposed to her as a kid. And she talked about television being like a sewage system that we have plugged into our living rooms and, and she used the SH t word she was like, we’re literally like having this stuff, like pumped into our rooms and our living rooms. And that made a really big impression on me. And, you know, I’ve been involved in the media and you know, it’s certainly not all bad. But it’s nice to have a healthy dose of that to like, remember, you know, this isn’t all wholesome. This isn’t all good. And it’s certainly not always truthful, moral, ethical, meant to serve my highest good, sometimes they’re trying to sell a pharmaceutical, you know, like, so it’s just good to keep that in mind. And another thing going in a totally different direction that I have found to be very powerful. If you are a person of prayer to any capacity, even if it’s very informal, a prayer that I have found is like rocked my world so many times, is just to ask, to have fear removed, like just, I ask, you know, like, please take away my fear, the fears that hold me back to fears that are false. And also, please show me, what is the reality of this situation? You know, like, whatever that situation may be, but like to be able to discern what’s true. And also ask that you be able to handle it too. Because sometimes it’s like, kind of like, oh, why did I Why did I ask this. But it’s always better to feel like you’re seeing clearly even if it’s, you know, hard.

26:59

It’s really funny to watch. People always say, cancel, cancel, or forget, forget, because they realize how powerful those words are, like, I didn’t really mean it.

27:11

True, our words are so powerful. Be careful what you wish for, right?

27:17

Mm hmm.

27:18

Because Be mindful about what you wish for?

27:23

Well, it doesn’t seem like it all the time. But one of the biggest things is that the Creator has the greatest sense of humor. And for if you want to make the creator laugh, make plans. So I like for you to give a specific example. That’d be great. If not, that’s also fine. But the specific example of Oh, yeah, the creator has a sense of humor. But I have this deadline for Canvas that I need to design. But I am not getting any inspiration whatsoever. So have you ever had to force something where you’re used to just allowing it to happen? But the

28:12

the creator does have a great sense of humor, I do get that. And usually if it’s not aligned with the irises humor, man, I bet you get a great kick out of this right now. Um, you know, the way I work, I work in a lot of layers, and I use techniques that just helped get me going. So I have run late on deadlines before, but I don’t usually suffer from like a painter’s block, because I, I can trust enough to just get started. And usually the painting will guide me. So. So that really eliminates the, you know, sort of the How to where do I even start, you know, because, because I start by just starting, and then something always evolves. Fortunately.

29:09

The other side is that you’re, you’re doing canvases for adults, but you also do children’s illustration. So I wanted to know if there has ever been an instance where you were working on a canvas, and you had inspiration to do that, but nothing came through but illustrations for children?

29:31

No, no, they’re pretty distinct different art forms. though. I do sometimes like so all of my children’s illustrations start by hand just pencil on paper. And then most of the time, I then take in digitally color, and sometimes there’s like a little moment of disconnected reality going on in the paintings. UDL, and I’m like, Oh, I can’t just like, you know, I can’t just delete, I can’t choose like, you know, undo what I just did, or I can’t just like drag and drop a color. You know, it’s like it, you know, I get sort of spoiled in the digital world and then versus the, you know, the painting world. But yeah, I haven’t struggled with, with kind of, you know, having the wires crossed otherwise.

30:31

Okay. No, just thought I’d ask. Because the other side of that, since you were bringing up the digital side. And in a previous life, I worked at an architecture firm. And before working there, I’d never seen any, being any human being walk up to a building and kind of just, in a way caress it, like they would just, especially if they designed it, right, there’s that there’s that connection. And I know with your art, or at least pre COVID. And you do a lot of interaction or you encourage interaction with your art. So I wanted to know, do you feel that way with Are these all personal? Like, from your essence, this is my personal art in how do you deal with that interaction now that we have to socially distance?

31:23

Mm hmm. Yeah. Right before COVID. I did have live exhibits, right, integrated storytelling, spiritual storytelling, and facilitated conversation and stuff with the artwork, and we use the artwork, not so much tactile, sometimes, I guess people would touch it. But more so just as a visual jumping off point to explore different spiritual topics. And the art is great for helping elicit personal associations and that sort of thing to help people think more with their heart than just like, think intellectually, and you know, what, what am I supposed to say right now, but kind of have their own insights. You know, I have a really unique relationship with the artwork that I am privileged to create. It’s not at all trippy. Like my process is not like I light incense and go into a trance, like, it’s very much. I’m showing up for work, and I get tired. And sometimes I get frustrated, like, it’s definitely me showing up to do the labor. But I, the paintings always win, like they never let me just impose my will on them. They always ultimately make me surrender if that’s what I have to do. And they end up becoming what I think they were meant to be. And I sort of see it more like, I’m sort of like a carpenter carving out these windows into some vision that we then all get to look at, but it’s not me. constructing the vision, I’m just sort of making the portal. And as such, when a piece is done, even though it’s like, I’ve been wanting it to be done, you’re like, Oh, I just you know, I want to finish this piece whenever. Once it is I I don’t really feel like it’s mine. Like it’s the funniest thing, but I oftentimes, like don’t even really have clear memories of even working on the piece even though, like my mom will remind me like, Oh, yeah, you had a freakout when that, you know, technique went wrong or something. And I’m like, Oh, yeah, I did. But yeah, once they’re done, I’m like, oh, wow, that’s cool. Like, who made that? That’s me. And I mentioned starting to feel that way with my book, even though my children’s illustrations are a little bit more like my specific vision rather than each opening up. But it’s starting to feel like it’s, it’s this thing that belongs to the world now and I was privileged to spend that time with it. But it’s, it’s like once my babies are grown, they’re grown.

34:29

I think you just highlighted a perfect example of CO creating. And when you have that co-creation it seems like it ‘s when there’s no accident, and it comes out the way it’s supposed to turn out. And I wanted to ask if that was a bigger picture of your life. I mean, I remember where I don’t remember I wasn’t there but just reading with. We’ve known each other a previous log maybe, but in midlife You had the reams of paper you were always drawing and then you were like us, you had the felt like you distance yourself from being an artist in you were had the acting bug, but it seems like you have gone back to the art or do you marry the art and the acting together?

35:18

Hmm. Well, they have found each other, which is pretty neat. When I transition to art back in 1718 2017 2018. I didn’t really think I would go back to asking, but I can have worked its way in with my, my live shows, you know, BC before COVID, and my public speaking and stuff. So it has worked its way in, which is really cool. Yeah, again, it’s kind of how life kind of comes together. You just keep taking one step forward. And, and the pieces sort of find each other. But, you know, we didn’t have an official marriage ceremony?

36:07

Sure, it would be, I’m gonna use that to that bc before COVID. It didn’t feel like there was the spiritual accelerant. And so Oh, yeah, it’ll happen. And it may have been a lifelong dream. And it was at the back burner for 1015 years, family career, what have you. But 2020 is the accelerant. Right? And so what would you say to someone that has had the ream of paper when they were their child, but now it feels like, quote unquote, real life is in the way, but a part of them is missing? How would they make that leap into doing what they love?

36:48

As an artist, my God, yeah. Wow, it’s kind of cliche. But it really is a matter of just making the decision. Like when, when it’s like, oh, one day, I want to write a book, you know, I get it. I was there. I’ve been there one day, it’s going to come together. Well, 2020 was a reminder that today is the day because tomorrow could look very different. Like we have no idea what tomorrow is gonna bring. And it’s always been that way, but it’s become very obvious this year. So like, when I finally decided, Okay, I’m, I’m going to finish my book, I gave myself two months, I was like, Okay, next two months, and cleaning the slate, and I’m gonna finish this book. And of course, it took a lot longer than two months. But I was already knee deep in them. So I just had to keep going. So someone may not be able to commit to a chunk of time like that. But I think you could find what feels authentic and work for you like, Okay, I’m going to, you know, by next month, I’m going to have a studio space set up, or I’m going to sign up for an online class or something. Because, though it is true, that life has this magical element and things do, you know, evolve in ways that you don’t expect, when there’s something that’s in your heart, that is your responsibility, and you have to honor it, and you have to be the one to make it happen. And then the news will come in and play and it’ll, it’ll evolve and be something even cooler and better than what you could have done on your own. But you have to show up first.

38:47

Mm hmm. And show up you did because I believe before we started recording, you were telling me about the upcoming deadlines for your book. And I like for you to talk about that.

39:00

Absolutely. So my children’s book, noble beings, spiritual handbook for children of all ages, which of course includes all of us because we all were children once and have an inner child within us and we never outgrow our need for spiritual guidance. It’s an illustrated book with 39 quotes from the Baha’i writings on topics like our spiritual nature, like who we truly are and how to live, how to treat others and how to pray. So this book noble beings, I released it for pre-sales last month, and the final day to order is December 8, for these first edition signed hardback books, so yes, if anyone is inspired or intrigued, I do hope they check out noble beings and December 8 at 11:59pm Central Time. Standard Time is the deadline to order.

40:04

It sounds like I mean, that is the art world, right? You don’t want one of few, not one of 3000 mass produced. So after this deadline, will the book go away? Or will it have that mass production in the future?

40:19

Right? So it’s all self published. And it’s made in the US by a company that’s in California and Utah. So I’m doing it all myself. And all I can guarantee is this first run. It’s only 500 books. I do hope to offer this in the future. But I make no promises. I don’t know exactly when or how or whatever. So people have moved, I would encourage them to get it now. If you know, and it’s true what you say about art, the book, I think, holds keys, for what we were talking about earlier about, like how to actually transform the world and make it a better place, like, I truly think that it can impact people. So I would like it to, you know, sell a gazillion million copies. But until maybe I partner with you know, a publisher or something, I don’t know if that’s possible. So right now, it’s just it’s just, you know, a small scale thing. And so that’s why I did the Indiegogo version for selling at

41:34

no problem. And in addition to that, if people love moons and other inspired art that was created about from you, you are co created by you and your co creative, higher energies. How can they get in touch with you? Yeah, of course. How could they get in touch with you to learn more information?

41:56

Yes, well, I would love it for them to get in touch with me. My name is Jacqueline Claire, and everything spelled the traditional way. And my website, and my Instagram and Facebook handles are all Jacqueline Claire art. So Jacqueline Claire, art.com, Facebook, Instagram. And those are the best ways to find me and on my website, you can sign up to my email list to get some perks and behind the same thing.

42:26

Awesome. Awesome. Well, you have just been tuned to another episode of Intrinsic Motivation from a Homie’s Perspective. This is Hamza and Jackie It was a pleasure. Let’s stay in touch.

42:38

Thank you Hamza. This is great. Thanks for having me.

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